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Mental Illness Essays

22 samples in this category

Is Mental Illness a Social Construct? Essay

Mental illness refers to a wide range of mental health conditions that affect your mood, thinking and behavior. It can be argued that mental illness is a social construction. Social constructionism states that something only exists because society built it, created it or needed it for its own development or interest (Boghossian, 2001). It will be argued through literatures whether mental illness is a social construct or not. There is evidence to suggest that the way people view mental illness...
1 Page 552 Words

It's My Life and My Mental Illness

Imagine if our society blamed people for being raped and claimed that it was their own life choices that had led them to such a horrific experience. Now, envision putting that shame, on someone who is fighting for their life, someone who is experiencing depression or anxiety. This happens every day, not just to rape victims, but also to the victims of mental illness. I think about this constantly as it’s everywhere I look. People keep getting blamed for having...
1 Page 645 Words

Media Stigmatization of Mental Illness: Persuasive Speech

Have you ever envisioned yourself on the reciprocating end of a story that sensationalizes only a portion of relevant information towards you? Shon brightly through a negative light, the media is evidently responsible for disseminating of adverse stereotypes and false descriptions of innocent victims who are silently suffering with mental health issues. Through the influential forces of manipulation and stigmatization, the media holds the power to control society’s thoughts and attitudes towards mental health patients. Inaccurately depicted throughout all media...
3 Pages 1319 Words

Mental Health and Mental Iillness

What causes mental illnesses and how does it affect those with it? An estimated 26% of Americans ages 18 and older suffer. Many people suffer from more than one mental illness. These disorders affect your mood, thinking and behavior. People who have these illnesses or disorders are caused from drugs, alcohol, family conflicts such as neglect or abuse, relationship difficulties, etc. Some people with an illness think they’re bad people or different per say but this is truly something that...
2 Pages 1069 Words

Mental Health and Mental Illness Should Be Taken More Seriously

In this essay I will be discussing my opinion on mental health, my personal experience, and why I believe it is not taken as seriously as it should be. Most people have been or will be diagnosed with a mental illness in their lifetime. Unfortunately, though everyone does not receive the help they need for these illnesses. Mental illness is normal and can affect anyone, even being passed down genetically. But yet there is still shame behind having it. I...
2 Pages 1007 Words

Mental Illness among Students as a Serious Problem of American Society

Mental illness is a major problem in the United States of America. Students suffer from mental illness and they do not know how to deal with it. Teachers are not trained to help students with mental illness which is a big problem because the most stress happens in school. Mental illness affects students in different ways such as, depression, anxiety, self-harm, suicide, etc. This is important because mental illness will affect students’ performance in school and can lead to suicidal...
3 Pages 1186 Words

Mental Illness and Justice System

How are individuals with mental illness approached by law enforcement? Taking calls for service for individuals with serious mental health issues and drug misuse consist of a small portion of police calls, but nevertheless consistent (AMelissa et al., 2018). Dealing with people with serious mental health issues represents roughly about 6-7% of all community contacts (AMelissa et al., 2018). Providing services to the mental health community continues to have exertions on resolution strategies throughout the U.S., while law enforcement tries...
2 Pages 964 Words

Mental Illness as the Strongest Epidemic of Modern Times

The strongest epidemic we face today, mental illness, is maybe not growing as fast as an infectious disease but it is harder to fix as it’s not even acknowledged in a right manner or sometimes not even at all. The issue peeks through popular music as top charts are filled with songs about depression, anxiety, isolation and alienation. These emotions unraveling through a time where technology is at its peak is no coincidence. Technology is the main reason behind this...
2 Pages 853 Words

Mental Illness in the 19th Century

Mental illness affects a big portion of the US population. The National Alliance on Mental Illness claimed that roughly one in five American citizens experience mental illness at some point during their lives, which is almost 20 percent of the total population (NAMI, 1). With such data available, it is no surprise that the approach toward mental health has changed recently as it is estimated that almost 90 percent of Americans value physical and mental health equally (Ansari, 1). However,...
2 Pages 813 Words

Mentally Ill People and How We Can Help Them

Mental illness is your level of psychological well-being which affects how you think, feel and act that range from not too serious to very serious. Examples of mental illnesses is depression, a mood disorder causing you to feel extremely sad or lose interest in everyday and schizophrenia, causing the person to have a decreased ability to understand reality. They are caused by a combination of genetic, environmental and psychological factors such as child abuse, feelings of low self-esteem or a...
2 Pages 779 Words

Poetry as a Cure for Teenage Mental Illness

You may think poetry is useless and dull, which it can be, but it also an amazing way to be creative and show what you feel. Poetry dates back thousands of years to the earliest literate cultures, before even written texts. In these times it was used for remembering history or law. Throughout centuries it has evolved into many new types of poems, topics and uses, such as Shakespearean sonnets or Japanese haiku. The poetry that is popular today is...
2 Pages 954 Words

Portrayal of Mental Illness in the Works of Goya and Gericault

Having died only four years apart from each other, it seems inevitable that these two extremely influential artists would have had some striking similarities in their work, from their preferred media to their actual subject matter; the large host of struggles they faced led them on a surprisingly similar path, depicting their own mental illness through painting. My practical work is what has led me to writing this essay today. My work has gone from an exploration of sinister, nightmarish...
7 Pages 3178 Words

Post-War Psychological Impact

Alexander C. McFarlane’s ‘The Impact of War on Mental Health: Lest We Forget’ is an article that uses the statistics and examples driven language to describe a sense of psychological trauma of people after the war. This article mainly describes the impact of war on mental health. In war, there are countless soldiers sacrificed, countless victims die of diseases and infections, the state is not functioning properly, and residents cannot live normally. The most terrible thing is that veterans and...
2 Pages 891 Words

Prevalence of Mental Illness in Entertainment Industry

Mental illnesses are health problems that involve how people thinks, behaves, feels, and intercourse with people. Besides, mental illness does not distinguish; it can affect anyone no matter of their age, gender, race, religion, background or other aspects of cultural identity. While mental illness can befall at any age, three-fourths of all mental illness starts at the age of 24 (American Psychiatric Association, n.d.). There are many types of mental disorder and the common types of mental disorder are obsessive-compulsive...
3 Pages 1187 Words

Psychotropic Drugs: Great Treatment Solution to Mental Illness

Mental illness has evolved over the last couple hundred years. From the theological model of the Middle Ages to today’s modern medicine, it is very clear that the understanding of mental illness has become better understood with time. According to the American Psychiatric Association (2018), “Mental illnesses are health conditions involving changes in emotion, thinking or behavior (or a combination of these). Mental illnesses are associated with distress and/or problems functioning in social, work or family activities” (para., 1). When...
5 Pages 2063 Words

Should Schools Screen Teens for Mental Illnesses? Essay

Many teens have mental health problems that get noticed by someone near them while many times it goes unnoticed. Suicide is the second leading cause of death for teens (Klass), making it where teens are more likely to die from a suicide than in a traffic accident, allowing kids to be screened reduces the risk of possible future suicides that could occur. In the United States, seventeen percent of teens had seriously thought and considered suicide with more than fourteen...
2 Pages 983 Words

Stigma and Discrimination against People with Mental Illness in Australia

The mental health of a person decides the behavioral patterns, feelings and their relationships with others. A broad spectrum of disorders is included in mental illness (‘Mental Health’). About one-quarter of Australian people are experiencing mental health problems in their lives especially between aged 16-85. The affective disorders like depression, anxiety and substance use disorders such as alcohol use are common. Additionally, women are more likely to have anxiety and depression than men (‘Mental Health’). Some people negatively see others...
3 Pages 1420 Words

Importance of Mental Illness Awareness

Over the course of ten years education has changed, sometimes good and sometimes bad. For the most part, our education is missing some important pieces of information. Mental health is something that has changed but has also become less talked about throughout societies. The education for it has decreased and is continuing to decrease. In future years the education for mental will drastically decrease. The more challenges will come up, and the more problems will be caused throughout society. Today,...
4 Pages 1668 Words

Problem of Stigmatization of Mental Illnesses in Modern Society

‘Stigma’ is a very basic word within the study of sociology that could be described by someone as a harmful mode of negative labelling towards someone else with a differentiating characteristic or attribute such as a form of mental illness or an intellectual disability which can lead to stereotypes, discrimination and even societal rejection possibly further damaging a person’s mental and physical state of mind. These people who are suffering from many different types of mental illnesses regularly endure two...
4 Pages 1993 Words

Understanding Mental Health and Mental Illness

This assignment will aim to provide the knowledge to understand the key symptoms of mental health and their treatment, it will go to explore signs of aggressive behavior and how to diffuse and control the situation. It will continue to identify the role of therapeutic communication skills in Mental Health both verbal and non-verbal as well as its strengths and weaknesses. Additionally, it will identify the different agencies working in the field of mental health and the support that these...
4 Pages 1724 Words

Why Are Depictions of Mental Illness in Films Dangerously Misinterpreted? Essay

For years, films have been criticized on how they portray mental disorders in film. From ‘Psycho’ in 1960, which devised the persistent confusion on whether Norman Bates is schizophrenic or has dissociative identity disorder to ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest’ in 1975, that created the idea that psychiatric hospitals are prisons where there is no concern on a patient’s rights; films struggle to escape the blame for the ongoing stigma relating to mental illnesses. Throughout the years, films have...
3 Pages 1188 Words

Essay on The Baker Act: The Florida's Mental Health Act

When you hear the Baker Act, what are your initial thoughts? One who is unfamiliar with the meaning may think the you’re referring to tasty baked goods. But that is far from what the Baker Act entails. The Baker Act is a Florida law, also known as the Florida Mental Health Act, which allows for involuntary evaluations for individuals who may need emergency mental health services and temporary detention up to 72 hours for those who may be impaired due...
2 Pages 955 Words
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