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How to Cite a Lecture in MLA, APA, and Chicago Styles

Lecture Citing in MLA 

There are certain differences, depending on whether you would like to cite a lecture that you have attended in person or the one that has been recorded or transcribed by another person. Let's learn how to cite a lecture that has been attended in person. Here is what you must provide: 

  • Lecturer's Last Name, First Name. 
  • Lecture Title. Provide it in quotation marks and headline capitalization. 
  • Course or Event Name. 
  • Day Month Year. 
  • Institution. 
  • Location. 
  • Lecture. 

The template for MLA Style Citation: 

Speaker last name, First name. “Lecture Title.” Course or Event Name, Day Month Year, Institution, Location. Lecture.

Works Cited: 

Jackson, Lesley. "The Pros and Cons of Machine Learning in Education." Special Education Research, 29 Jun. 2019, Oxford University. Lecture. 

In-text Citation: 

(Jackson) 

Now when the speech has been recorded in audio or video format or transcribed in a book or web platform it's necessary to provide the following data: 

  • Lecturer's Last Name and First Name. 
  • Speech Title. 
  • Website Name. 
  • Day Month Year. 
  • URL. 
  • Description of the content type. 

Here is the template on how to reference lecture notes:  

Speaker last name, First name. “Speech Title.” Website Name, Day Month Year, URL. Content media type. 

Works Cited: 

Churchill, Winston. "We Shall Fight On The Beaches." International Churchill Society. 4 Jun, 1940. https://winstonchurchill.org/resources/speeches/1940-the-finest-hour/we-shall-fight-on-the-beaches/. Text transcription. 

In-text Citation: 

(Churchill) 

If you find this too challenging or have other types of content to cite, consider checking our online MLA citation tool. It will be a great time-saver as you will get things done faster and will learn how to do things accurately! 

Lecture Citation in APA 7th Style

APA 7th edition style does not use any citing for lectures that have been attended in person and the citing rules are only applicable for those cases when lectures have been recorded or transcribed officially. In other words, your readers must be able to locate the lecture. Otherwise, as you cite class notes, mention such a lecture as personal communication as you quote it in your assignment. 

(Dr. Fleiss, personal communication, October 3, 2004)

When there is a speech available as a presentation, things are done this way: 

Last Name, Initial(s). (Year, Month Day). Speech Title [Paper presentation]. The conference, City, State, Country, URL.

References Page: 

Osbourne, J. (2016, May 5). Fables of the reconstruction: the role of meditation for the negotiations and the Cold War [Paper presentation]. History Readings 2016: Political Science, London, United Kingdom. 

In-text citation: 

(Osbourne, 2016) 

When you need to reference lecture slides that have been published in PowerPoint format, use this template: 

Last Name, Initials. (Year, Month Day). PowerPoint Speech Title [PowerPoint slides]. Department Name, University, URL.

References Page: 

Sanders, B.C. (2019). The Green Energy controversy [PowerPoint slides]. Engineering Department, Arizona State University. https://news.asu.edu/

In-text citation: 

(Sanders, 2019) 

When you are citing recorded or transcribed speech, use this template: 

Lecturer's Last Name, Initials. (Year, Month Day) Speech title [Speech audio recording]. Website Name. URL.

References Page: 

Hooley, W.F. (1898, September 21). Lincoln's speech at Gettysburg [Speech audio recording]. Library of Congress. https://www.loc.gov/item/99392021/

In-text citation: 

(Hooley, 2:13) 

Lecture Citing in Chicago 

Unlike MLA and APA formats, Chicago Manual of Style format uses footnotes for in-text citations and a classic list of entries that are placed in the Bibliography. There is also a need of a description for the media type since one can cite a class lecture, which will require relevant rules. 

Here is the template to follow for a lecture that has taken place in the classroom: 

Lecturer's Last Name, First Name. "Title." Lecture, Institution or Event, Location, Month Day, Year. 

Bibliography Entry: 

Staples, Darren. "The Role of the Female Nurses in the Crimean War." Lecture, New York Medical School, Syracuse, NY, January 9, 2021. 

First and Subsequent Footnote: 

1. Darren Staples, "The Role of the Female Nurses in the Crimean War" (lecture, New York Medical School, Syracuse, NY, January 9, 2021). 

2. Staples, "Nurses in the Crimean War."

When there's powerpoint and you need to quote a lecture that represents slides, it will look this way: 

Kelly, Angelo. "Street Musicians in the 90s Europe." PowerPoint presentation, Cologne University, Cologne, June 9, 2017. 

Finally, when the speech has been recorded, follow this Chicago citation template: 

Last name, First name of the speaker. "Speech Title." Recorded at Location, Month Day, Year. URL. 

Bibliography Entry: 

Baker, Newton Diehl. "On League of Nations." Recorded at the World War I Conference, New York, September 25-26, 1919. https://www.loc.gov/item/2004650545/.

First and Subsequent Footnote: 

1. Diehl Newton Baker., "On League of Nations," recorded at the World War I Conference, New York, September 25-26, 1963, 2:13, https://www.loc.gov/item/2004650545/. 

 

2. Baker, "On League of Nations," 2:13. 

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