Short on time?

Get essay writing help

Literary Devices Essays

118 samples in this category

Essay examples
Essay topics
Lord of the Flies written by William Golding is a novel that tells a story about a group of English school boys who find themselves stranded on an island without any adult supervision. From the start, it is quite evident that there are some distinct personality differences between the boys on the island. Because of this, the batch of boys experience different challenges whilst they are stranded on the island which results in numerous conflicts betwixt the boys. Eventually, there...
1 Page 548 Words
Individual and social sacrifices are prevalent in A Tale of Two Cities. Charles forgoes the family legacy to hide the stigma of his family’s immoral conduct. For the sake of his eventual dignity, Dr. Manette chooses to forgo his independence. Many French lives were sacrificed in the revolution to ultimately eliminate dictatorship. All in all, sacrifice guides both ordinary people and greater national businesses to greater prosperity and satisfaction. Although making sacrifices is difficult when only considering short-term benefits, in...
2 Pages 959 Words
The story of “To Kill a Mockingbird” is narrated by Scout in an uncertain future, in the form of a flashback. That way, it is possible to monitor closely the formation of character in character during childhood. The simple narrative provides a readable to get involved quickly, where the point of view of Scout adds sweetness and a nostalgic tone to the plot. The many secondary characters are built from the discoveries of Scout, like Calpurnia, the family’s maid, and...
1 Page 535 Words
Monsters are a metaphor for fate and the destructive forces of nature. “He who fights with monsters should look to it that he himself does not become a monster . . . when you gaze long into the abyss the abyss also gazes into you.” Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good, and Evil, 1886 Subsequent to the publication of J.R.R Tolkien’s “The Monsters and the Critics” scholars have found it easier to view Beowulf predominantly as a work of art rather than,...
6 Pages 2562 Words
As fictionalizations of universal human experiences, fairy tales have the capacity to communicate core societal values and expectations essential to an individual’s survival within a particular context. The modification of literary fairy tales over diverse contexts enables composers to expound reflection on the cultural context. Prevalent ideologies Through the reimagining of the traditional oral tale, Little Red Riding Hood (LRRH), in Charles Perrault’s cautionary tale, Le Petit Chaperon Rouge (1697), followed by Rotkappchen (1812) by the brothers Grimm, and lastly,...
2 Pages 954 Words
O Captain! My captain is a poem composed by the American poet Walt Whitman who is called the bird of democracy. Most of his works reflect his ideas about women's rights, immigration laws, and labor issues. This poem in particular is an elegy written after the death of former American president Abraham Lincoln. Walt Whitman's "O Captain! My Captain!" stands as a testament to the profound impact that poetry can have in capturing the collective emotions and mourning the loss...
1 Page 615 Words
Native Son opens with the ringing bell of an alarm clock—a wake-up call not only for Bigger and his family but also a warning to America as a whole about the dangerous state of race relations in the country in the 1930s. Wright sees a black population that, though freed from outright slavery, still lives under terrible conditions, is unable to vote, and is terrorized by groups like the Ku Klux Klan. The North is somewhat more integrated, but many...
2 Pages 849 Words
The Great Gatsby was written by Francis Scott Fitzgerald back in 1925. It continues to be one of the most studied novels in the modern world. It discusses themes such as the wealth of the ‘old money’ society, segregation, and the illusion of the American Dream. Gatsby was a young man who ran to accomplish astonishing wealth. Despite his more insignificant than prestigious history, he is still repudiated by those who were born in money. Addressing Gatsby’s example, this event...
1 Page 516 Words
In life, taking the known route does not necessarily have the most beneficial ending- this is partially due to the fact that the unknown road provides options for personal growth and new experiences. This idea is conveyed throughout ​The Road not Taken​ and is specially reinforced in the last stanza. ​The Road Not Taken​ was written by Robert Frost in 1915. This poem functions as an extended metaphor about someone who is faced with a simple yet significant decision. The...
2 Pages 904 Words
J.D. Salinger's “The Catcher in the Rye” is an American coming-of-age fiction novel that was initially published in July 1951, it takes place during the American post-World War 2. The novel is about the narrator himself, Holden Caulfield who is a 16-year-old boy who had just been expelled from Pency Preparatory School. He tells the experiences he had when he was at prep school and after. He searches for authenticity in a society that is of a consumerist culture and...
2 Pages 753 Words
Whilst at first glance this poem, Aboard at a ship’s Helm by Walt Whitman, is displaying the scene of a ship at sea, the closer one looks the more apparent it becomes that this is merely an overall metaphor for someone who is beginning to take control of their life, steering it in the direction that they want by making their own choices. To assist with this the poem consists of many effective aesthetic features and stylistic devices including the...
1 Page 567 Words
O’ Henry’s story is an emotional prologue that sparks emotions upon reading it, especially for people who have experienced the challenges in marital life. Marriage is a good tradition as it can help nourish as a whole, yet the healthy cactus in Henry’s story shows the symbolism of what pain can inflict on someone. The symbolism in the novel shows that marriage and divorce go hand in hand. Love is healthy, yet the marriage tradition is full of flaws when...
2 Pages 756 Words
Blacklight “Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that.” (King Jr.) Heart of Darkness, a novella written by Joseph Conrad, takes place on the River Thames and follows a narrator listening to a retelling of Marlow’s journey along the Congo River. While traveling into the heart of Africa, Marlow learns of the origins of Kurtz, a remarkable ivory trader seeing over the Inner Station, and obsesses over their potential future meeting. However, once arriving at the Inner Station...
2 Pages 889 Words
Writing about this topic I have to first focus on two things so my explanation of allegories that are present in “Lord of the Flies” can be received clearly. Firstly, the book was written in a way that establishes the ground for an enormous amount of allegories, and I will go into the depth of their meaning to explain them. Secondly, we have to understand what exactly is an allegory. I’ve chosen this topic because it is my favorite literary...
4 Pages 1756 Words
In the allegorical novel, Lord of The Flies, author William Golding explores the essence of human nature in its purest form. From a group of stranded boys on an island to create an inner 'beast', Golding writes a story about the inevitable deterioration of order and civility when evil arises in mankind. Golding reveals harsh truths about the boys' savagery and urges, connecting to several biblical stories. In Lord of The Flies, Golding uses religious allegories from three well-known biblical...
2 Pages 879 Words
Introduction: The crucible, By Arthur Miller, has been relevant to many different groups across the world, throughout history. The conception of corruption prevailing and the truth being disregarded are the main focuses of the text. They relate to the major human experience that shapes our responses and reactions to heavy-weight world conflicts. That in the face of conflict true human motivations are unveiled for the world to see. This is seen in both The crucible and to kill a mockingbird...
4 Pages 1826 Words
Social reformer, Dickens, utilizes the theme of social responsibility to criticize the capitalist, yet supposedly ‘Christian’ Victorian society he lived in. He wanted to “haunt” his readers with the social message of the importance of expressing the allegory within Dickins’ novella: lower classes can no longer be ignored. In the extract, from Stave 3, Dickens is presenting “Ignorance” and “want”, two “youth” who show the despair of poverty. The Ghost of Christmas Present begins by showing the children “from the...
1 Page 593 Words
In the modern context, the concept of ‘old’ and ‘new’ money is difficult for an average reader to understand. With a massive influx into the ranks of the hyper-rich by those who have gained their wealth through means like the Internet, values and perceptions of these concepts have drastically changed. Today's culture among developed nations romanticizes the concept of a ‘rags-to-riches’ story, a self-made person who makes their own fortune through hard work and entrepreneurial efforts. In the environment of...
1 Page 638 Words
“I cannot make you understand. I cannot make anyone understand what is happening inside me. I cannot even explain it to myself.” The preceding quote is an excerpt from Franz Kafka’s “The Metamorphosis” which is a novella about Gregor, a salesman, who unexpectedly turns into a huge, unidentified insect one morning. ‘The Metamorphosis” is an allegory for humankind and Gregor’s transformation is more of a symbolic one than a physical one. The book is sectioned into three sections and the...
2 Pages 815 Words
“You can't tell any quite a story while not having some kind of a subject matter, one thing to mention between the lines”(Robert Wise). a subject matter is that the message or messages Associate in Nursing author is making an attempt to convey by incorporating them into their writing. Theme plays a very necessary role in each book, serving it to progress and have a temperament. while not theme, a story would be flat and have obscurity to travel. several...
3 Pages 1441 Words
The short stories can be comprehended as the modern-day written version of tales rendering the folktales that are mostly written with many moral insights and cultural values. Allan H. Pasco, a distinguished professor of Nineteenth-Century Literature, defines a short story as short, literary prose fiction, open to any topic or material, but the deciding factor is usually not the presence or absence of a saint or supernatural events, but rather the artistry in the creation of a reality whose existence...
4 Pages 1621 Words
“We must believe in free will because we have no choice.” This event was one of the most profound statements that have ever been spoken to me, and I heard it from my grandfather, Grandpa Bob, days before he passed away. The reason he uttered these words while in the hospital was because of a conversation that triggered a discussion of the concept of determinism. At the time, I was a confused 11-year-old visiting a sick relative and wasn’t educated...
3 Pages 1419 Words
The recent rise of suburbia in mainstream media has promoted the suburban lifestyle to be the most desirable and ideal way of life. However, when understood in depth, suburbia often hides a deceptive façade as a means to achieve a sense of social superiority. The short story, ‘The Swimmer’ (Cheever, 1964), explores the social and psychological repercussions of the constant display of a superficial persona in American suburbia. The story concentrates on the middle-aged man Neddy Merrill’s journey through the...
3 Pages 1202 Words
In the play ‘No Exit’, Jean-Paul Sartre implements the ideas of the philosophy of ontology and consciousness. In exploration of these philosophical ideas, like ontology, which is the ‘study of what exists’, the author works to emphasize the importance of self-awareness. Ontology, itself, categorizes the nature of existence into three states of being. These states of being include: being-in-itself, being-for-itself, and being-for-others, which all hold connection to the characters. Likewise, consciousness, also explores the idea of being self-aware, and emphasizes...
3 Pages 1357 Words
In the novel, ‘Kindred’ by Octavia Butler, and the poem ‘Harlem’ by Langston Hughes, they both use symbolism to communicate how racism destroys the dreams and ambitions of those affected by its grasp. The poem ‘Harlem’ by Langston Hughes uses symbolism to communicate how racism destroys the dreams and ambitions of those affected by its grasp. Hughes opens the poem by saying, “What happens to a dream deferred, does it dry up like a raisin in the sun?” (Harlem, 1-3)....
3 Pages 1177 Words
The author Thornton Wilder uses dialogue in the play ‘Our Town’. There is a lot left to the imagination as the sets are simple and throughout the acts, the narrative provided by the Stage Manager sets the scene in what is known as the dream play technique. The stage set is very basic with only a few props, table and chairs, the audience is left to conjure up the scenery from their imagination. Wilder does this on purpose to lead...
2 Pages 762 Words
Mending Wall is a poem by Robert Frost. Robert Frost: Robert Frost was a leading American poet of the 19th & 20th centuries who is well known for his use of imagery in poetry. He dabbled with both farming and was also an English teacher but was always convinced that his real calling was to be a poet. He is one of the most famous and influential poets in American history. He is not known as an experimental poet but...
3 Pages 1331 Words
In Elie Wiesel’s horrifyingly real, raw memoir Night, he develops a very strong central idea surrounding the significance of identity; he makes it very notable that one’s identity can be easily influenced and changed subject to your environment and personal hardship. From the beginning to the end of the book, we follow Wiesel along his journey of surviving through the holocaust, struggling to keep a hold of his identity and his deterioration of faith in God. We watch him evolve...
1 Page 649 Words
Elie’s life within the city of Sighet in 1941 was completely different from once the Holocaust had started. though there was a war, Elie Wiesel was unaffected whereby he targeted on following his father’s occupation. Life in 1941 for Wiesel wasn't as overwhelming for Elie compared to once the holocaust began. “I was almost thirteen and deeply observant” shows that Elie was implausibly young and probably naive once growing up get despite this. His maturity was incontestable through the book...
3 Pages 1493 Words
These are some examples of one of the bad experiences the Jews had to face during the holocaust. This is how Elie Wiesel felt in Night by Elie Wiesel himself. Wiesel is a Jew during the holocaust who is sent with his father to different concentration camps. He and his father face a lot of challenges to the point where he questions his life every day. Throughout Night, there is a great deal of dehumanization taking place in the form...
1 Page 466 Words
price Check the Price of Your Paper
Topic
Number of pages
Email Invalid email

By continuing, you agree to our Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.

Join 100k satisfied students
  • Get original paper written according to your instructions
  • Save time for what matters most
hire writer

Fair Use Policy

EduBirdie considers academic integrity to be the essential part of the learning process and does not support any violation of the academic standards. Should you have any questions regarding our Fair Use Policy or become aware of any violations, please do not hesitate to contact us via support@edubirdie.com.

Check it out!