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Frankenstein Essays (by Mary Shelley)

72 samples in this category

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The phenomena of good and evil relating to social class, status, reputation and appearance have been explored and discussed in many literary works for hundreds of years. However, there are two monster classics that are known today specifically for commenting on reputation and appearance in relation to good and evil in the respected eras they lived in. These authors include Mary Shelley, the woman who wrote Frankenstein and Robert Louis Stevenson who wrote Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde that was...
3 Pages 1369 Words
According to the renowned philosopher Plato, “Human behaviour flows from three main sources: desire, emotion and knowledge.” Yet what does it really mean to be human? Is it determined by your attitudes, values, beliefs or emotions? The definition of a human being is constantly questioned in modern society, defining the ways cultural assumptions, attitudes, values and beliefs are conveyed. The emotional responses of Frankenstein and Blade Runner bring into question the definition of what it means to be human. The...
3 Pages 1324 Words
Over the course of time, relationships change. Sometimes the bond of characters can grow, and at times they fall apart. Healthy relationships are based on mutual respect and treating others with decency. In Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein, the relationship between Dr. Frankenstein and the monster could easily be labeled as unhealthy due to the origin of the monster. Although identifying that their relationship is unhealthy, the complexity of their relationship cannot be looked at. The monster is full of anger towards...
2 Pages 840 Words
Frankenstein; or, the Modern Prometheus was written by Mary Shelley, the novel’s subtitle is named “Or, the Modern Prometheus.” The subtitle suggests the first great scientist of Greek mythology who teaches medicine and science, takes fire from Zeus and gives it to humanity, or constructs a human being from clay. Prometheus was said to be the wisest of all the Titans. He stole fire from the Gods of Mount Olympus. For doing that, he was harshly punished by having an...
2 Pages 928 Words
Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is often read as a cautionary tale about the dangers of hubris and scientific advancement however I will also be discussing an interpretation of the text as a commentary upon the debates surrounding slavery at the start of the 19th century. The essay begins with a close analysis of Frankenstein in regard to the debates surrounding slavery, particularly a view that Mary Shelley may have held; the sudden emancipation of slaves would be dangerous as they could...
6 Pages 2699 Words
In the Romantic era, there was a book named “Frankenstein” written by Mary Shelley. Then in the Victorian era, “The Curious Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” by Robert Louis Stevenson and both novels are monster horror stories. Both of these novels have different literary themes since they were written in different time periods and the authors had different beliefs. With the novels being from different time periods I am going to compare both of them in order to...
1 Page 676 Words
The term Gothic fiction refers to a style of writing that is characterized by elements of fear, horror, death, and gloom, as well as romantic elements, such as nature, individuality, and very high emotion. These emotions can include fear and suspense. In this paper, I will be discussing the writer and works of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. According to the definition of gothic fiction, Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein supports the characterized elements of fear, horror, death, and gloom as well as romantic...
3 Pages 1234 Words
Mary Shelley’s novel, Frankenstein, is a timeless classic. It is an iconic work of literature that has been widely analyzed and discussed for nearly 200 years. In it, she tells the story of Victor Frankenstein and his creation, the monster. The distinction between Victor and his creation is often blurred as readers debate who is truly the real monster in this story. While Victor created the creature with an ambition to do good, he ultimately failed to take responsibility for...
1 Page 619 Words
‘Grendel’ was written by John Gardner and in the novel, unlike the creature Grendel lives at home with his mother who occasionally lacks interaction with him. Because of this Grendel isn’t too pleased with his mother most of the time. For most mothers in today’s society, they communicate with us every day however that was quite the opposite when it came to his mother. For that reason, Grendel willing wants to engage within the society, by observing the humans. The...
1 Page 493 Words
Grendel and Frankenstein’s monster are both unsatisfied with themselves and are both in search for something more than what life has already given them. Grendel already knows how he feels about life, he finds it boring and repetitive, but there is something about the way that humans do things that fascinates him. Frankenstein’s monster wants to find more meaning in life than just being a scary monster that is so disliked by so many. These monsters are so unsatisfied with...
4 Pages 1608 Words
Isolation can damage both our physical and mental health. As humans, we are hardwired to interact with others. When one is isolated from others, the brain begins to act in strange ways to preserve its sanity. The author of ‘Frankenstein’, Mary Shelley, uses the monster to develop the themes of the destructive nature of isolation, drawing one towards violence to fill the void of loneliness. When Victor Frankenstein is successful in bringing back the dead, he fears his creation and...
1 Page 632 Words
Similarly to the society we live in, characters in a literary text belong to different social status, and their social status contributes to the development of characterization. For example, Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein written in 1817 and John Milton’s Paradise Lost, an epic poem written in 1667 involves characters that are in a high social status, an outcast of the society and the ones that are protected by superior one. Social status in Frankenstein and Paradise Lost is significant and...
3 Pages 1153 Words
Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein was a real breakthrough during the 19th century and classed as a great modern horror story. There are many themes presented and initiated by Mary Shelley throughout the novel, however, in my opinion the themes of Feminism and religion are those mostly prominent and have a great standing point from the beginning of the novel until the end. Another name for the novel was in fact ‘The modern Prometheus.” This is hugely relevant to the Religious aspect...
5 Pages 2359 Words
Authors often focus on physical appearance to point out major human flaws. This is an approach that appears in Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” in which Frankenstein’s creature epitomizes the “Otherness” whereby due to his grotesque appearance the creature endures loathing and rejection both from his creator and society. The creature becomes isolated resulting in vengeful behavior. Shelley wrote the story during the 19th Century when distinctions in race, gender, and class were rampant in English society. Through the metaphor of Frankenstein...
3 Pages 1195 Words
“Yet even that enemy of God and man had friends and associates in his desolation; I am alone.” Compare and contrast the presentation of Frankenstein’s monster and Dracula as outcasts in society in light of this statement. In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818) and Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897), Frankenstein’s creature and Dracula are both presented as outcasts in society. They are both presented as outcasts in very different ways, but also in some similar ways too. Frankenstein’s creature is able to...
6 Pages 2798 Words
Most of us can understand the serious consequences modifying our food and life can be. Whether it is injecting pesticides in our food to make them last longer or wanting to change the genes in our children, they can seem great at first but they can end up having unintended dangers that can soon to be harmful for not only us, but animals and plants as well. Those who do understand the negative effects to these topics and agree, don’t...
2 Pages 1119 Words
My comprehension about Mary Shelley, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Bram Stoker, is that they are all around creators of renowned books, for example, Robert's well known novel 'Fortune Island', Bram Stoker's epic 'Dracula', in like way, Mary Shelley's story 'Frankenstein'. These creators all lived amidst the times of the late, late 1800's. They were all amazing in their inheritance. The likenesses that the greater part of the makers share for all objectives and purpose behind existing is that they are...
1 Page 563 Words
Traditionally Gothic writing deals with supernatural issues set in isolated regions. However, imbalanced human emotion is at the central cusp of horrific and terrifying events. The key focus in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s The Rime of The Ancient Mariner is that both critically explore moral and social issues within humanity. These authors implement conventions beyond being solely about science and fantasy worlds. This is to convey a deeper message impacting the reader’s views on their own society’s...
5 Pages 2302 Words
The gothic novel ‘Frankenstein’ by Mary Shelley and Robert Frosts poetry, each examine the theme of nature. Both these texts do so in order to explore and convey the feeling of the reader and main character as well as portraying the effects of neglecting nature. Frankenstein relates human connection with nature with his idealistic representation of nature in contrast to the disgrace that is The Monster. Shelley displays her characters in specific natural settings to show the contrast between nature...
2 Pages 772 Words
“He who blinded by ambition, raises himself to a position whence he cannot mount higher, must thereafter fall with the greatest loss.”- Niccolo Machiavelli As the rate of scientific discoveries and innovations grow exponentially, the question arises; is there a limit to how high we can soar? Ambition is a great trait to possess, however, like all things in life, too much can be unknowingly dangerous. A mind fixated in an end goal overlooks many of the issues that arise...
3 Pages 1156 Words
Responsibility is a powerful burden to bare, one of which often no one likes to admit to. Usually, by the time one's self comes around to accept and take ownership over their creation and its mistakes, it is too late, and tragedy has struck. Over the past few years, artificial intelligence in autonomous cars have and will continue rising. Along with this, so will the body count. Who will be held legally responsible for these fatalities? Although this shouldn't be...
3 Pages 1513 Words
The difference between “good” and “evil” is shown with the difference between the women in the novel as they all have different roles. In Dracula it is shown clearly with the two characters of Mina and Lucy. The former fit the ideals of the Victorian woman while Lucy represents the New Woman. Mina is idealized throughout the novel, as she is an educated woman, whose intelligence is very helpful during the fight against Dracula. She is also loyal to Jonathan...
1 Page 521 Words
It’s true for any writer that there will be influence occurring from the world around them in their work. This is especially true for Mary Shelley when she wrote her novel, Frankenstien. Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s The Rime of the Ancient Mariner can easily be paralleled to much of the work of Shelley’s novel. This parallel could possibly be attributed to Mary Shelley’s love for the works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge during her time. One of these mentioned parallels is man’s...
1 Page 429 Words
Throughout centuries, Christian elements have been purposely hidden in various works of literature. The epic poem “Beowulf,” is a famous tale that displays a brave man named Beowulf, who fights evil monsters in order to save others. Beowulf is a confident man who is highly esteemed by many because of his arduous tasks and victories. Another story that exhibits the themes of Christianity is “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” This is a poem, written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, that...
4 Pages 2020 Words
Authors create works to convey their experiences and views on society. The texts they create are utilized to send a message and express their standpoints on social narratives. In the related works, the movie ‘Blade Runner’ (1982) and the novel ‘Frankenstein’ (1818), the authors contradict the dominant social narratives of their time, supporting counter-narratives, including romanticism and the regress of technology and unfettered capitalism, respectively. These texts effectively portray a view of the world in their time in history through...
2 Pages 1029 Words
The extract from ‘Frankenstein’ demonstrates how Shelley utilises first person narrative to express the inner thoughts and workings of Victor Frankenstein’s brain and conscious. Whereas in ‘North and South’, Gaskell employs the use of third person narrative to contrast Margaret’s sophisticated way of life with the working-class characters in the novel. Narrative voice and perspective are important in every novel as it is the medium through which the author expresses the thoughts and views, they wish each character to have....
4 Pages 2021 Words
Introduction Introduction: Frankenstein, published in 1818 was written in the peak era of Romanticism and the gothic genre. This statement leaves one curious about the category that the novel fits into. Thesis: After examining the romantic and gothic genres, it is clear that Frankenstein respects the ideals of Romanticism and the gothic genre because of the novel’s elements such as the characters, the setting, and, conventions. Paragraph 1: To begin with, Frankenstein fits the characteristics of romantic settings due to...
3 Pages 1203 Words
Literary works serve to trigger more thinking of several timeless questions by transcending their settings and lending themselves to more generic universal realities and meanings. As such, readers can take away many messages and values from a novel that was written more than a century ago and reflect on our contemporary world, which is the case with Mary Shelley’s thriller novel “Frankenstein”. The novel serves to shed light on the potential dangers of excessive unguided knowledge and probes the influence...
3 Pages 1549 Words
Teaching Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein raises many questions, but when I state that one of my teaching perspectives is feminism, more questions are asked. Feminism as a perspective is not only relevant to our times but provides another way to look at the past – be it at the time when Frankenstein was written, or even earlier. Students often say that the text can’t be feminist because they search for heroines, looking for strong, successful female characters. However, the presence of...
1 Page 419 Words
Introduction Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" is a seminal work that delves into the complexities of human identity, exploring the nature vs. nurture debate through the lens of Dr. Frankenstein's creature. Shelley's narrative serves as a profound exploration of the ongoing philosophical and psychological discourse regarding the origins of human behavior and personality. Indeed, Dr. Frankenstein's creature stands as a symbol of this enduring debate, embodying the struggle between innate predispositions and external influences. Who’s to Blame: Genes or the World? Dr....
1 Page 447 Words
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