Persepolis essays

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When I think of the word Innovative, I think of words such as ideas, creativity, imaginative, truth, and originality. I believe being innovative as a writer is being able to create creative, original, thoughtful, content that readers can relate to or experience as they read the story. A piece of writing that can help a reader make connections to characters or themes in a creative way and also experience emotions fall into innovative writing. Being innovative is trying to add...
3 Pages 1548 Words
How does one perceive religion? In literature, when authors include religion throughout their writing, they generally portray it positively or negatively, based on their perspective. However, in Persepolis, Marjane Satrapi describes her relationship with religion as evolutionary. In the late twentieth century, the Islamic Revolution came to Iran and this religious reform pressured new rules and enforced a change in lifestyle for the people of Iran. Persepolis is a coming-of-age graphic memoir written through the lens of Marjane Satrapi, in...
2 Pages 916 Words
In Iran, there are different regulations and laws for women living in the country. Iran has different policies that men and women have to follow. The rules for women can restrict their freedom. In the book Persepolis, Marjane Satrapi shows an upper-middle-class woman growing up in Iran and the different restrictions that even women of her class have to endure. The gender norms in Iran have negatively affected the women in Iran. The culture, religion, and gender norms in Iran...
4 Pages 1778 Words
Persepolis, written by Marjane Satrapi, is a novel that reveals the author’s life as a young, Iranian girl up to her early adult years during the Islamic Revolution. Persepolis mentions subjects of gender inequality, peer pressure, and the lives of children and adults living amongst the effects of the Islamic Revolution. The purpose of this paper is to reflect on and analyze the events that took place in the novel, Persepolis, and further connect it to the theories, concepts, and...
4 Pages 1670 Words
Reflective statement: While reading Persepolis, I was quick to learn that the Sharia laws put in place to enforce the codes of Islam were taken far more extremely in 1980s Iran than what most Muslim countries experience today, and the interactive orals helped broaden contextual considerations as to why that is the case. Concluding in-class discussions and further research, one thing to note was that Iran, before the Islamic revolution (and despite a growing hatred for the shah) was an...
4 Pages 1695 Words
Throughout Western education, the concept of the winner writing the history books is truly embodied as great tales are spun about the accomplishments of the British Empire or American Veterans recalling the trauma of World War II. However, the Third World, which occupies four-fifths of the planet, is very much brushed to the side with the broad umbrella teachings of being poor, uneducated, uncivilized and ultimately needing to be saved by the West. The past fundamentally affects how we act...
4 Pages 2048 Words
Reflective Statement: How was your understanding of cultural and contextual considerations of the work developed through the Interactive Oral? The interactive oral allowed me to view Marjane Satrapi’s graphic novel, Persepolis as more than an interesting story. Before reading the text, my political understanding of the region was limited, yet class discussion allowed me to make stronger connections between the sometimes, incorrect Western perceptions of Iran and the reality of the situation which extends certain social and political freedoms to...
4 Pages 1897 Words
The graphic memoir The Complete Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi portrays the experience from the author’s childhood in Iran to her adulthood in Austria. The story happens with the background of the Islamic Revolution of 1979. Born in a family with advanced and open-minded parents but living under the influence of radical change in society and politics, the main character Marji’s childhood is not the same as other children’s. Marji’s inward world is in dilemma and this situation almost runs through...
3 Pages 1563 Words
Persepolis is a black-and-white graphic novel written by Marjane Satrapi during the late nineteen seventies, a period marked by the civil war between Iran and Iraq. This autobiographic novel takes place in Tehran where the Iranian government, interrupted by an Islamic revolution, inducted a tumult among the population. Indeed, this theocracy led to a form of oppression against women and put them on a low pedestal. Marji, the protagonist of this graphic novel will serve as a witness of the...
3 Pages 1180 Words
A war can set back many things in life and can come out of nowhere and destroy everything you love. In 1979 a revolution had happened called “the Islamic Revolution”. Changing many lives and setting back everyone from the life they once had. Marjane Satrapi is the main character of the book of Persepolis. Marjane was very young but she was still outgoing. In the book, Persepolis Marjane was young at the time of the war. The war surprised many...
2 Pages 725 Words
In Persepolis, a story of a childhood in Iran, Western ideology and culture are prevalent in a country where it is prohibited. Throughout the graphic novel, the author incorporates many examples of Western culture and ideology which represent particular ideas, themes, and attitudes that are resented by the Islamic regime. Satrapi integrates most of the Western references through the protagonist, Marji, who overlooks the standards set by the Islamic regime in the West. In the graphic novel, Persepolis, Marjane Satrapi...
2 Pages 999 Words
Part 1 of the book Persepolis starts just after the Iranian Revolution that took place in 1979, which caused the downfall of the Western country-backed dictator known as the Shah of Iran. This led to the rise of the Islamic Republic which oppressed and marginalized the major secular groups and groups that didn't align themselves with the new regime. This leads us to the protagonist of the story Marjane Satrapi who is also the author of the book. So the...
4 Pages 1838 Words
In class, our main focus is globalization. We are forced to question what globalization is, its origin, how it affects us and vice versa. As a class, we try to conjure up a time, place, and reason for why globalization is important and relevant in our lives. However, I have come to an understanding that globalization is a way of life, and we are simply living in it. It is in everything that we do, even when we are not...
2 Pages 788 Words
Our lives in this world are like living through our own stories and experiences that build up who we are. We tell our stories to others for various reasons and in a way, it's like remembering our past selves to understand who we are in the present. Our stories start off with building our identity. Many people's identity starts off with simple physical traits like their family, religion, ethnicity, nation, culture, gender, etc. In the 1980s, Iran made it mandatory...
3 Pages 1389 Words
In our interactive oral we discussed the cultural and contextual considerations of Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi. During our discussion we discussed the Iraq and Iranian War and I found this discussion quite intriguing and engaging. The interactive oral gave me a unique opportunity to understand Persepolis in extra detail as we explored several different ideas and themes. Our discussion began by finding out what ignited the war between the two countries. Through discussing this, we gathered that he relationship between...
2 Pages 764 Words
The big argument with all the books that have turned into films or the reverse is the similarities and differences between them. On most films, they say based off the book, so they do not have to exactly copy word for words what the book says. In this case with the graphic novel Persepolis the film sticks to the novel’s storyline. There are some minor differences in detail though. Marjane Satrapi’s autobiographical graphic novel shows the events in history that...
1 Page 607 Words
In the years since the 1979 Iranian Revolution, the country of Iran has built up some very negative reputations in the West. The actions of certain extremists cause the world to associate Iran with terrorism, corruption, and production of deadly weapons. This is represented in President George W. Bush’s 2002 State of the Union Address, when he classified Iran as part of the “axis of evil”. However, the vast majority of the Iranian people are not evil terrorists. They are...
4 Pages 1956 Words
Persepolis is a completed autobiographical series by author Marjane Satrapi that shows her upbringing in the war-torn city of Tehran, located in Iran. The citizens of Tehran were subjected to years of war and religious extremism. The environment of her childhood in Iran had changed her personality. This will be the central theme of this paper. In order to explore how the author’s life had been shaped by the Islamic revolution, we must understand the background information surrounding the unrest...
3 Pages 1385 Words
The transition between childhood and adulthood is a time of growing independence along with constant questioning, especially when being exposed to the cultural norms of society, some of which are divisive and not always driven by pure motivation. When becoming adults, our personal world is shaped around what we have been taught and through our experiences. This highlights that it is inevitable that you will be influenced by the world and people around you, but you will always have the...
3 Pages 1449 Words
Persopolis Guided Literary Analysis The graphic novel ‘Persepolis’ written by Marjane Satrapi, follows the author and the retelling of her experiences and feelings during the time of the Islamic Revolution which took place in Iran in 1980. The book explores many themes and notions such as feminism, gender roles, freedom, power, justice, social classes, and religion just to name a few. In short, the book really delves into the themes of personal and national identity through the experiences of Marjane...
3 Pages 1272 Words
Introduction: Recognition of human features is a natural process and it affects thinking and how others perceive the world. By removing these human features, the brain cannot process what usually stops one from treating others with dehumanizing disrespect. In 1961, Stanley Milgram, an American social psychologist, conducted the Milgram experiment which was a test based on dehumanization and the rates of obedience and was a very important experiment with extremely troubling results. In these tests, there was a teacher and...
6 Pages 2640 Words
To commence, in Persepolis, Satrapi explores how people adventure captivity and freedom in case they would want to live and have a normal lifestyle while committing acts of revolt against the government or oppressors. Marjane Satrapi lived her early life in Iran, at a few levels during the Islamic Revolution. The governmental modifications were taking locality at the time, and thus the citizen’s notion that they desired to induce extra freedom, however, in fact, they needed to be living in...
6 Pages 2817 Words
Individuals experience childhood in various conditions and as they develop, their environment impacts them from numerous points of view. In Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, she is a 10-year-old who lives in Iran that has encountered groundbreaking occasions, for example, the Islamic Revolution which happened in 1979, and the Iranian and Iraq war in the 1980s. Marjane utilizes these occasions and showed them as a realistic novel for the honor-winning diary, Persepolis. Satrapi's realistic novel Persepolis is a bildungsroman on the grounds...
2 Pages 830 Words
As long as there is injustice in the world, there will be voices of protest. People who stand up against their oppressors, whether it is apparent or not. For instance, in Marjane Satrapi's Autobiographical Graphic Novel Persepolis (2000), she shows forms of silent protest towards the Iranian regime. Similar themes of protest to Persepolis can be seen in an extract of Maya Angelou’s “Still I Rise” a poem about the hardships of overcoming prejudice. Page 131 of Persepolis shows that...
2 Pages 916 Words
Persepolis, Marjane Satrapi’s graphic novel, sheds light on a perspective of middle eastern women not explored previously by western audiences. Satrapi presents a rare outlook on a situation very few have endeavored, as an Iranian woman spending a lot of her time in western culture. Dissatisfied with how Iranian women were portrayed in western cultures, Satrapi challenges these stereotypes by offering a new perspective. In her words, “From the time I came to France in 1994, I was always telling...
4 Pages 2043 Words
Marjane Satrapi's graphic novel Persepolis tells of her life from the age of 10 to 14 during the Islamic Revolution. It all started by telling all women to wear a veil. Boys and girls are separated at Marji's French school. Marji decided to become a prophet because he saw that there were many problems in the world that he thought could be solved. Sometimes you express your emotions to God. Marji's parents participated in anti-government demonstrations. He discovered that his...
1 Page 462 Words
“The magic of a story is when the characters come to life and defy our expectations.” ― H.S. Crow There are many ways an author can tell a story. No matter what way they choose, having a well-developed character will make the story more appealing. The ability to make your character really can make a reader more invested in your story because the readers can understand what they are going through. The change in self-esteem in Meg from A Wrinkle...
3 Pages 1612 Words
Marjane presents Iran as a country that underwent through 2500 years of tyrannical rule and submission. The country has been in continuous war with a cavalry of Arabs that invaded the country, Mongolians, and Europeans encroachment after the discovery of oil. Persepolis begins right away after the Iranian revolution that led to the downfall of the Shah of Iran, who had the backing from the American government leading to the thriving of an oppressive Islamic republic. The regime distrusts and...
4 Pages 1946 Words
In Sophocles' play Antigone and Marjane Satrapi's Novel Persepolis, the two main characters in both pieces are quite similar. Based on both of the main characters, Antigone from Antigone and Marji from Persepolis set out the role of a modern feminist. Both Antigone and Marjane have a big reason for why they are fighting for themselves and others around them. Antigone the daughter of Oedipus, breaks the social rules by going against the government. Marji is a young Iranian girl's...
2 Pages 700 Words
In the book, Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi she finds herself growing up amid the Islamic Revolution. She talks about her childhood and how at a very young age she had to grow up very quickly. Marjane had witnessed a lot of disaster and tragedy at a young age. The revolution sparked a lot of controversy between the government and the citizens of Iran. Some of the laws that were put into place only affected the women. Marjane and her parents...
3 Pages 1483 Words
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