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Poetry Essays

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It is no secret that of all four seasons, spring is a favorite for most. Find it inspirational as well? There are numerous reasons for that including the regrowth and rejuvenation that it brings to life. Flourishing leaves, blossoming flowers, and the warm weather have proven to be a source of inspiration for numerous writers. That might explain why spring is a preferred subject in most poems. Lots of metaphysical sonnets and lyric poems have been composed courtesy of this...
2 Pages 849 Words
In this poem, Yeats talks about the Irish war of Independence. Basically, this poem is created around the idea of Irish nationalism and revolution. In 1916 Irish had a great war against Great Britain. But in this war, they were not able to get their freedom and they lost a lot of their heroes. But this movement, the sacrifice of their martyrs gives the strength and the consciousness of nationalism. All Irish hearts have only one purpose. They want the...
1 Page 372 Words
No Second Troy is a poem by William Butler Yeats, and it is one of his most celebrated works. The poem is a typical lyric, and it expresses the feelings of a poet who is in a state of misery and pain. Overall, the poem centers on a single issue of his disappointment, pain, and agony. 'Her' in the poem indicates that the poet is addressing the woman he loves in his past days. Most of the sentences in the...
2 Pages 1016 Words
The Waste Land is a poem of breakdowns, psychological breakdowns of marriages and relationships, breakdowns of poetry and language and evidently the entire world. The carnage of the first World War had laid waste to Europe and made a mockery of civilisation thus starting the evolution of modernism and new forms of expression. After the war, it was T.S Eliot who had to represent and sustain a culture that was on the brink of collapse. First published in 1922, The...
5 Pages 2106 Words
Intro: Why does poetry speak to us in a way that grasps our attention and makes us want to discover more? Edmund Spenser’s ‘Sonnet LXVII’ (1595) offers an insight into a huntsman who is in pursuit of a lover, William Blake’s ‘A Poison Tree’ (1794) teaches us of the underlining conflict between a friend and a foe and William Butler Yeats’s ‘Leda and the Swan’ (1923) acknowledges the cruel and harrowing depiction of rape between Lena and Zeus, the God...
3 Pages 1408 Words
Democracy in the United States has been in a constant state of change. To this day, Democracy is still evolving to fit the times. New laws passed, old laws challenged or abolished, and ideas constantly being shared. Currently we get most of our current information about these changes from news media, but in the 19th century there were many writers who used their skills to talk about changes that were happening and to bring light to changes that needed to...
1 Page 566 Words
An attempt to bring to light the cruel condition to which black slaves are destined in the plantations in the United States of America, Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s 1847 socio-political poem “The Runaway Slave of Pilgrim Point”, draws on the parallelism between black and white as a metaphor for the different conditions for the black and the white man. This essay will explore both the figures of speech and the meter used by the author to convey her message, but particularly...
3 Pages 1258 Words
Introduction "Acquainted with the Night" is a renowned poem by Robert Frost, published in his collection "West-Running Brook" in 1928. With its evocative imagery and introspective tone, the poem invites readers to delve into the depths of human loneliness and despair. This literary criticism essay will analyze the key elements of "Acquainted with the Night," including its themes, imagery, and poetic devices, to understand the profound impact and enduring significance of this haunting poem. Themes of Isolation and Despair One...
1 Page 565 Words
Introduction to the Theme of Death in Poetry Loss is something that is felt by everyone, but the way it is dealt with differs from person to person. Some people will spend time reminiscing over happy memories about what they lost, others will ignore the fact that someone is gone, and others will love and appreciate the person more when they are gone. The effects of death are represented throughout the poems, “In Blackwater Woods” written by Mary Oliver, “Nothing...
7 Pages 3078 Words
Introduction about a poet: Robert Lee Frost was born in March 26, 1874 and died in January 29, 1963.He was an American poet, highly regarded for his realistic depiction of rural life and his command of spoken American. His works often draw the background of rural life in New England in the early 20th century and use them to study complex social and philosophical issues. A popular and often-quoted poet Frost was revered throughout his life and accepted four Pulitzer...
2 Pages 888 Words
The poem ‘I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud’ by romantic poet William Wordsworth, is in the form of lyric poetry and was first published in 1807. The poem describes a memorable day that the poet had and details how recalling that day brings him joy, even when he thinks of it at a later date. This essay will perform a close reading of the poem, focusing on voice, form, and imagery, as well as a stanza-by-stanza analysis. It will also...
2 Pages 979 Words
The poem may additionally moreover start on a pretty unhappy be mindful when the speaker claims that he “wandered lonely as a cloud”, then again the tone of the poem hastily grew to boost to be joyful, when he spies a crew of daffodils “fluttering and dancing in the breeze”. He declares that with such a sight “a poet ought to no longer on the different hand be gay”, in unique when he is in such “jocund company” as the...
2 Pages 974 Words
Quality poetry offers readers insight into their own relationship with their world, presenting themes prevalent within their own lives that address the complexity of being human. Eliot advocates the need for the confrontation of uncomfortable truths by exploring the unease of immortality caused by modernity which internally manifests disconnection, evoking spiritual rebirth. The pervasiveness of these ideas is evident in “The love song of J Alfred Prufrock” and further established in his poem “The Hollow Men”. The exploration of such...
2 Pages 846 Words
Through the exploration of T.S Eliot’s ‘Prelude’s’ (1911), ‘The Hollow Men’ (1925) and ‘The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock’ (‘Prufrock’ 1915), the audience is exposed to the isolation, depersonalisation and corruption of society that Eliot endures by his ‘single voice’ of apprehension, engaging with our own uncertainties. Eliot’s poems endure the hardship of people being hungry for any form of spiritual experience in which through the exploration of the five poems, becomes increasingly obvious. His poetry is set in...
4 Pages 1773 Words
When you hear the name Shakespeare what do you think of? Do you think he was overrated or do you think he was a great established writer? At first, I thought he was overrated and didn’t want to study him and his work. Only after studying have I realized that he is very important to our history. Even though he passed away over 400 years ago we are still studying him but why? Shakespeare is a mastermind who has helped...
1 Page 562 Words
Summary of Sonnet 116 This is a true Shakespearean sonnet, also referred to as an Elizabethan or English sonnet. This type of sonnet contains fourteen lines, which are separated into three quatrains (four lines) and end with a rhyming couplet (two lines). The rhyme scheme of this sonnet is abab cdcd efef gg. Like most of Shakespeare’s works, this sonnet is written in iambic pentameter, which means each line consists of ten syllables, and within those ten syllables, there are...
2 Pages 1115 Words
This sonnet helped to start more on the theme of modern love from a woman’s point of view. The emphasis is on repeating and strengthening the love of the lecture for someone. It gives the sonnet the universal appeal of no mention of a particular name or gender. The first line is peculiar because it is a question that is almost interactive. The poet challenged himself to sort out the reasons for her love, define her intense emotions, and define...
1 Page 661 Words
Romantic or platonic, lifelong or fleeting, love surrounds and shapes our meaningful relationships every day, teaching us lessons, presenting us with new experiences, and changing our lives forever. Good morning, I am Maddison Clark and today, as my role as literary expert, I will be analyzing how the theme of love, within two poems from different time periods, differ and compare. Love is an important and common theme addressed within poetry, as audiences, no matter age or era, are able...
4 Pages 1608 Words
Poetry Foundation presents William Shakespeare’s famous poem, Sonnet 130, titled “My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun.” According to Spacey, the poem talks of a mistress who does not conform to the conventional standards of beauty. Shakespeare compares the mistress with the beautiful things of life, but he finds none that perfectly fits the mistress. In this regard, Shakespeare challenges traditional beliefs and offers a new perspective on what it means to love a woman. Also, he argues that...
2 Pages 898 Words
William Shakespeare`s ‘Sonnet 130’ is an unusual sonnet since it contravenes the concept of female beauty and, instead, provides alternative perspectives concerning beauty and love. Written probably keeping his lover or mistress in mind, Shakespeare compares her physical features and mannerisms with the unlikeliest of natural objects. It stands apart from other sonnets because it breaks the poetry conventions that were in practice at that time. During Elizabethan Era, all poets, including Shakespeare himself, positively portrayed female beauty and elevated...
2 Pages 839 Words
Sonnet 18 was written by William Shakespeare, that articulates and accentuates the sentiment of passion and love. The poem expresses the poet’s endearment and perpetual devotion to his subject and how the subject surpasses all tangible beauty. He explicitly expresses this notion through the manipulation and application of figurative language, poetic devices, and imagery. In this poetry essay, the poet discusses their subject possessing characteristics surpassing nature and how nature and its seasons of summer/spring are perennial. The poet elaborates...
1 Page 529 Words
The use of supernatural machinery is a prominent feature of many epics. Supernatural machinery is a must for an epic and Iliad is not devoid of this. Homer has used the Olympian gods and goddesses who take part in the poem separated into two parts. The most powerful gods and goddesses are equally balanced in the two groups such as Aphrodite and Apollo in support of the Trojans and Hera, Athena, and Hephaestus in support of the Achaeans. In the...
1 Page 650 Words
Homer was a Greek epic poet and supposedly the author of The Iliad and The Odyssey which are thought to be composed sometime between 750 and 650 BC. In Homer’s Iliad, the characters Sarpedon (mortal son of Zeus) and Patroklos (companion of Achilles) who both die noble and heroic deaths are commemorated with the grandest burials, whilst in Homer’s Odyssey, the character Elpenor (youngest companion of Odysseus) was given a much smaller burial. Sarpedon, who was killed in battle by...
1 Page 564 Words
In ancient Greek myth, heroes were humans, male or female, of the distant past, gifted with superhuman abilities and descended from the immortal gods themselves. What defines the heroic life itself is the fact that humans are mortal. The certainty that one day you will die is what makes us human, distinct from animals who are unaware of their future death and from gods who do not die. In this essay what makes a hero and the qualities one possesses...
2 Pages 926 Words
It is considered that the beginning of romanticism was in 1798 by publishing the lyric ballads and it ended in 1832 after the death of Walter Scott. England is still the leading power in Europe. The whole first half of the 19th century it was characterized by the war of England against Napoleon until 1815 and later on. All different kinds of blockades appear, and massive revolt inside the country, and new form of reactionary parties. Landed gentry has two...
4 Pages 1808 Words
In the three pieces, every author employs varying forms of Logos, Ethos, Pathos, and Kairos to support their work and ensure that their arguments are strong and persuasive, and compelling. The first work in an essay written by Peggy McIntosh called “White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack” was written to show what types of benefits she as a white woman receives in our society providing an exceedingly long list of each and every one of those benefits while also giving...
3 Pages 1466 Words
Municipal Gum by Oodgeroo Noonuccal poem analysis “Castrated, broken, a thing wronged” The famous Oodgeroo Noonuccal, once known as (until 1988) Kath Walker mentioned this in her poem, Municipal Gum. Where she would then go on to raise awareness of the tremendous discrimination by white Australians against Aborigines up until the 1960s. Oodgeroo is of aboriginal descent making this topic ‘hit heart’ as she also lived through this time period, therefore allowing her a firsthand perspective as to what happened....
1 Page 627 Words
Introduction Li Young Lee is a renowned poet and writer whose works delve into themes of identity, memory, love, and family. This critical analysis essay examines the depth and complexity of Lee's stories, exploring the literary techniques, symbolism, and themes that define his narrative style. By delving into the intricacies of Lee's storytelling, we gain insight into the profound emotional resonance and universal human experiences present in his work. Symbolism and Imagery: Unveiling the Layers of Meaning Lee's stories are...
1 Page 544 Words
In his sonnet, William Shakespeare discusses a man, possessing characteristics associated with nature, and how said nature and its seasons of summer/spring are perennial, as well as elaborating on the splendor of art and flora. The theme is the timelessness of love and admiration. How change is an inevitable prospect, yet, it does not hinder the poet’s veneration for their subject of love. He explicitly expresses this notion through the manipulation and application of figurative language, poetic devices, and imagery....
1 Page 442 Words
The poem ‘Crossing Brooklyn Ferry’ by Walt Whitman focuses on human beings as social creatures by stating that humans are connected through life and their interactions with one another. Whitman shows this in the poem in paragraph 3 where it is stated, “I am with you, you men and women of a generation, or ever so many generations hence;/ Just as you feel when you look on the river and sky, so I felt;/ Just as any of you is...
1 Page 642 Words
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