Short on time?

Get essay writing help

Utilitarianism Essays

29 samples in this category

Essay examples
Essay topics

Utilitarianism! Ever heard the saying, “for the greater good”? That’s the heart and soul of it. Imagine you’re at a crossroads and have to pick a path. One way might make a few folks ecstatic but leave many in the dumps. The other? It could sprinkle a bit of happiness ...

Show More
It is 2019. America is the land of the free, and when it comes to marijuana that means thirty-three states allowing medical marijuana and eleven states legalizing it for recreational use. This, however, has not brought freedom back to the tens of thousands of Americans who have been charged with marijuana possession. Many of these people are incarcerated in private for-profit prisons that lobby their interests to government representatives. This industry has a heavy interest in keeping as many prisoners...
1 Page 652 Words
It is commonly acknowledged that the ethics of abortion have long been a source of discussion and debate, with debate spanning decades. The term literally refers to the act of terminating a pregnancy by either extracting an embryo or the fetus before it reaches development (Forster 52). Miscarriage is the term for an unintentional abortion; conversely, induced abortion is the term for a planned abortion. The removal of the fetus when it has the capacity to survive in the outer...
2 Pages 971 Words
Philosophy Term Paper: Jeremy Bentham Jeremy Bentham is a famous English political radical and philosopher. Among his philosophical works, the most well-known is the concept of utilitarianism in which the acts and actions are assessed based on the potential outcomes and consequences (Stanford Encyclopedia, 2019). The most aspired result or the relevant outcome is happiness or pleasure to ensure for all and sundry in the course of action. Bentham was incredibly influenced by empiricists and enlightenment thinkers such as David...
2 Pages 985 Words
Executive Summary This is qualitative research that possesses the capacity to introduce the standard of Utilitarianism as a standout amongst the most effective and enticing ways to deal with regulating morals. John Stuart Mill is an early established supporter of Bentham, who concocted this philosophical hypothesis. John Stuart Mills by one means or another did share some unique perspectives with respect to some part of this hypothesis in light of the feeling of bliss. In later circumstances, Philosopher Karl Marx...
6 Pages 2769 Words
Journalists being free to publish information is vital to a functioning, democratic society, and an informed population. However, a number of checks and balances are required to ensure that this right is not abused. As the Council of Europe’s guidelines on safeguarding privacy in the media state, “a journalist’s right to freedom of expression is not absolute. Journalists have rights and responsibilities” (Council of Europe, 2018). This means that the press must be ethical and responsible and that, contrary to...
6 Pages 2747 Words
Ethics is the study of morality, Ethics is the moral principles governing a person’s or agent’s actions. I would call myself a Utilitarian-Egoists ethicist because I believe in doing that act that produces the greatest good for the masses but however, in doing that act that produces the greatest good for the greatest number we must always put our self-first, although at times self-egoism may seem selfish, it is always fair and intrinsically good to be self-motivated. My internal reflection...
7 Pages 2982 Words
Utilitarianism means that you do anything to get the most amount of happiness. No matter what it takes in utilitarianism the bigger factor and, really the only factor that matters is being happy and receiving pleasure. If it means killing someone because it brings pleasure and for the greater good to you and others than that is okay. Utilitarianism also uses humans as always having to do good for others. You will always have to volunteer o always try to...
4 Pages 1846 Words
In spite of debate with regards to the inception of ethics- are they natural or are they learned, are they God-given, or are they manmade develops - the way that ethics are priceless to people stays uncontested. Imagine a reality where we don't have ethical behaviors controlling us. In such a world, what is to prevent us from killing one another, going as far as to push humankind off the extreme edge of destruction? Maybe that is an outrageous situation,...
2 Pages 939 Words
Throughout history philosophers have developed ethical theories that attempt to distinguish what is morally right and wrong. Although these theories differ from one another, they all can be applied to multiple aspects of our society. Some examples of these theories include Utilitarianism, Cultural Relativism, Social Contract Theory, and Kantianism. The differences between each of these theories are as follows. Utilitarianism focuses on the outcome of an action as the primary motivation and whether or not that conduct is ethical (Hill,...
4 Pages 1937 Words
Introduction Abortion should remain legal in Australia. For many people, abortion is essentially a morality issue, concerning the legal rights of a women’s body and the rights of the fetus. Pro choice and pro life have seen to be the compelling arguments of this issue and will be expressed in this essay. Early Priests of the Catholic church and Early church councils have expressed their views against abortion taking the “pro life” stance. However it is recognised that today there...
3 Pages 1312 Words
There are many differences between utilitarianism and Kantian ethics. In Utilitarianism, our actions should result in more happiness than pain. Act-Utilitarianism is the thought that whether something is right or wrong directly correlates with how much happiness comes from the individual action. Whereas, Rule-Utilitarianism is the idea that rules were created to result in the highest amount of happiness. John Mill states “The creed which accepts as the foundation of morals, Utility, or the Greatest Happiness Principle, holds that actions...
2 Pages 1135 Words
In Parfit’s attempt to create a theory of morality, labelled Theory X, which is a non-person affecting view and doesn't allow for situations in which an intolerable conclusion could be reached, he found what he called the ‘Repugnant Conclusion’. Parfit’s original formulation of the Repugnant Conclusion was “for any possible population of at least 10 billion people, all with a very high quality of life, there must be some large imaginable population whose existence, if other things are equal, would...
5 Pages 2459 Words
Utilitarianism is an ethical hypothesis usually considered to have been established by Jeremy Bentham, a nineteenth-century English thinker and social reformer. It is based on the idea of satisfaction and tries to promote and enhance it. The thought here is that everybody looks for happiness and joy, and that it is a definitive objective of every person to be cheerful and happy. So, as per traditional utilitarianism, when an individual wish to act in a morally stable way the person...
5 Pages 2277 Words
Dilemma 1 states that Blair has accessed Sam’s computer without his consent and has discovered Sam’s gambling bets with a local sports bookmaker over the last several days. Since employees of the casino are forbidden to partake in any gamble activities, Blair is currently concern as to whether he should report on his co-worker or refrain from disclosing his illegal acts. This case is an example of an ethical dilemma as neither of these proposed decisions will provide a satisfactory...
3 Pages 1360 Words
Utilitarianism is the right action is the one that brings about the most overall happiness. This basically means a person makes a decision based on what he or she will have the most positive outcome. One should be an agent for their own happiness. Many decisions people do daily are for selfish reasons anyway. Right actions are the ones that produce good according to Utilitarianism. There are three ideas that attack Utilitarianism which is justice, rights, and backward thinking. McCloskey...
7 Pages 3063 Words
A businessman decides that he is going to buy the only source of water in a region and will sell rights to it in order to make a profit for himself. The businessman then proceeds to charge fifteen times more for water rights, effectively putting everyone in the farming community out of business. With the local economy extinguished, the townspeople grow poorer and are unable to meet their basic needs. The businessman thinks that he did nothing wrong in this...
2 Pages 1041 Words
Interpretive Psychology A possible option of measuring utility is through, Interpretive psychological testing. A psychological study is a theoretical fact we do in our brains to test a philosophical hypothesis. The theoretical fact should be something that could actually happen (and generally it's something that actually happened or will happen later). In order for us to test the hypothesis, it must have an impact on what might be valid if the theoretical fact were real. You could then oppose this...
5 Pages 2233 Words
Philippa Foot in his publication “Killing and Letting Die,” formulated a thought experiment that incorporated two situations. Despite the two different scenarios yielding the exact same consequences in the end, the different methods employed in arriving at those similar outcomes raise questions revolving morally permissibility. In the first scenario which we shall call Rescue I, a person is in a situation where he must drive swiftly in order to rescue five individuals from an imminent ocean tide. Along the way...
4 Pages 1767 Words
Utilitarianism is one of the most established and influential normative ethical theories, that determines right from wrong by focusing on consequences. It states we should strive to generate the greater good to the greatest number of people who stand to be affected by the action. In this essay I will be highlighting both the positive and negative features of utilitarianism in practice as illustrated by David Meeler’s analysis of the global textile industry. Before underlining the positive and negative aspects...
1 Page 478 Words
There are several ethical theories that attempt to distinguish what is morally right and wrong. Some examples of these theories include Utilitarianism, Cultural Relativism, Social Contract Theory, and Kantianism. Utilitarianism focuses on the outcome of an action as the primary motivation and whether or not that conduct is ethical (Hill, Utilitarianism PowerPoint, Slide 3) The problem with this theory is that it doesn’t pay direct attention to whether an act is carried out with good or bad intentions. They also...
4 Pages 1637 Words
About 13 million metrics of tons of plastic ends up in the ocean every year, causing sea animals to suffocate, starve, and drown. Plastic not only affect animals, it also has a negative effect on humans because it contaminates the sea food humans eat. (PEW) As a result, humans are being stressed everyday about the consequences of the use of plastics. Utilitarianism takes a role in the negative consequences of plastics since it is impacting a great number of the...
2 Pages 978 Words
Act Utilitarianism’s direct aim is to produce the best outcome and welfare for the greatest number of people while weighing the sometimes heavy costs of what could be the best outcome for the many over the worst outcome for the few. Simultaneously, this theory wishes to conclude what decision brings the most good now and in the future in the hopes of identifying acts that qualify as a specific reasoning for the decisions that will result in the most efficient...
2 Pages 995 Words
There are many ethical issues that are currently occurring. One topic that is talked about currently is the idea of genetic engineering in people. While genetic engineering can provide benefits to people with genetic illness, it is not ethically accepted under many forms of ethical traditions. Because genetic engineering only benefits a select group of people, it is often times not regarded as ethical in many situations. However, if genetic engineering can be adjusted and reworked to fit the general...
3 Pages 1557 Words
To begin with, the issue of fairness arises with companies’ attempt to gain an advantageous market position through the exploitation of consumers’ unalterable needs in an unusual market condition (Crane et al., 2019:375). Thus, the justification to exploitative pricing’s fairness is being debated with the following two ethical theories. Firstly, consequentialism determines morality and ethicality solely based on consequences (Robertson and Walter, 2007). Utilitarianism, as a paradigm, asserts a universalism and maximalism view where ethicality depends on maximizing the greatest...
1 Page 407 Words
Capital punishment is the most disputable legitimate discipline forced by the Criminal Justice System of our nation. This type of discipline stands apart from the rest because of its brutality and seriousness. There is general understanding that the death penalty is the most serious discipline that a judge can give a guilty party. Capital punishment is the authorized killing of someone as punishment to a heinous crime. Capital punishment is done in prisons to inmates that have committed the most...
6 Pages 2528 Words
Have you heard the news about the moral dilemma of self-driving car? It’s a car with an AI programmed to forfeit its travelers to spare the lives of others, in case of a genuine mishap. It works on the principle of utilitarian morals, which would try to limit the total number of casualties in an accident, regardless of whether it implies hurting individuals in the vehicle (Gent). As describe by John Stuart Mill utilitarianism is the view that dictates an...
3 Pages 1276 Words
INTRODUCTION Autonomous vehicles also known as self-driving cars are highly popular around the world to advance smart mobility and sustainable cities (Lim and Taeihagh, 2019). However, at some point in the near future when something has gone wrong on the road, it has to choose between two options to make a maneuver of whether to save the passenger inside the car while putting the pedestrians at risk or to save pedestrians on the road and put its own passengers at...
3 Pages 1222 Words
The aim of this paper is to compare and contrast the various viewpoints of Christian deontology and utilitarian physician with regards to euthanasia. Euthanasia involves termination of the life of an individual to relieve them from their suffering due to terminal illness. The act of euthanasia as sparked a lot of debate among philosophers who have deontological and utilitarian perceptions. Deontological ethics justifies whether an action is right or wrong with regards to the moral code of the action. On...
5 Pages 2221 Words
Leadership literature has not remained the same as over the years it has been developed by various researchers and there has been a strong belief that leadership is something that is modifiable as there is a transformation constantly happening in the way people think over the years. The principal theories appeared throughout the 19th century such as the Great Man Theory, the Trait theory, the Behavioural theory amongst many others. Leadership theories are adjusted due to the changes happening in...
3 Pages 1138 Words
price Check the Price of Your Paper
Topic
Number of pages
Email Invalid email

By continuing, you agree to our Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.

Join 100k satisfied students
  • Get original paper written according to your instructions
  • Save time for what matters most
hire writer

Fair Use Policy

EduBirdie considers academic integrity to be the essential part of the learning process and does not support any violation of the academic standards. Should you have any questions regarding our Fair Use Policy or become aware of any violations, please do not hesitate to contact us via support@edubirdie.com.

Check it out!