Voting essays

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Have you ever wanted to know what it was like to be able to vote? Well, some believe that the voting age should be changed, in particular, lowered to 16 years. As for me, I do not support this and believe that the voting age of 18 should remain, because we should be more mature to vote. Today, kids under the age of 18 continue to rely on their parents' choices because they don’t have time to research when they...
1 Page 552 Words
People hope that each round of national elections will result in a positive change in our country's prosperity and development. Having an efficient election process is to have a smooth flow and to be fair in choosing or electing leaders who run for the said positions. Voting is our civic duty, so we, the youth, must vote. Elections act as a forum for the discussion of public issues and facilitate the expression of public opinion since the electoral process is...
1 Page 536 Words
Introduction As we all know, a voting age is the minimum age established by law that a person must attain before they become eligible to vote in a public election. Today, the most common voting age is 18 years; however, voting ages as low as 16 and as high as 25 currently exist. Most countries have set a minimum voting age, often set in their constitution. In a number of countries voting is compulsory for those eligible to vote, while...
6 Pages 2519 Words
I turned 18 on the 15th of March 2019. The thought of turning 18 had me over the moon with excitement. The amount of responsibility that came with it, but also the number of benefits of turning 18 was beyond amazing. The fact that I could now drive, the fact that I now had a later curfew, the fact that I would be finishing school this year, but above all that, it was the fact that I could now utilize...
2 Pages 731 Words
In his essay, ‘The Human Cost of an Illiterate Society, Jonathan Kozol speaks about all the issues surrounding illiteracy around the world, but also in the United States. He tells about all the downfalls in the lives of those who can’t read and their lack of future or even current success because of it. The English language becomes a fear for those who can’t read, and many times it is forced upon them to have to do things they are...
1 Page 525 Words
“To ignore the effects that voting laws have on different racial groups would be, at best, irresponsible and, at worst, dangerous” (Quillin 23). Voter ID laws, better described as voter impersonation laws, are laws that are put in place to deter citizens from fraudulently voting. These types of laws are made to police in-person voting and do little to protect against mail-in and absentee voter fraud. Stemming from practices that were put into place to discriminate against already disenfranchised groups,...
4 Pages 1973 Words
The Roots of Modern American Divide & Polarization Rights are a fundamental part of the United States of America. The creation of these rights and their protection date back to 1789. Politics and rights movements seem much more intense now in the twenty-first century however, the divide in the debate about rights has been around since their creation. More recently this divide has turned to polarization as parties become more partisan on rights issues and the public continues to push...
5 Pages 2406 Words
Freedom to vote is one of the most important and most hard-earned political rights outside the bill of rights. We began as a nation where rights were restricted to only white men. It’s only because of perpetual hard work and the firm beliefs of people like Sojourner Truth, Alice Paul, Martin Luther King Jr, and many more that the franchise of voting rights was expanded to include people of color and women. Democracy cannot be taken for granted. It involves...
3 Pages 1388 Words
Voting Rights for Felons On November 8, 2016, an estimated 6.1 million citizens were barred from engaging in casting their votes because of felony charges (Cheung). This disenfranchised population included people currently in jail and also millions of people under parole or probation, and those who had completed their sentence. It is estimated that 3.1 million people are denied their right to vote because of laws that restrict them even when the sentence is complete. According to a report by...
3 Pages 1228 Words
Voting is one of the most important things you can do as an American citizen. It is an extremely special thing that we often take for granted. Voting is not just a right that we have. It is an opportunity to make a difference in our country’s politics and perhaps the course of American history. Throughout history, people from all over the world have sacrificed everything in pursuit of obtaining the right to vote. It’s a right that even today,...
4 Pages 1861 Words
Lowering the Legal Age to Vote Over the course of American history, the right to vote has seen substantial changes in who can or cannot act on the privilege. For example, in the earliest days of American history, only those who were white, male, property owners had the right to vote. In the many following years, African Americans gained the right to vote as well as women, Asian Americans, and Native Americans, and all discriminatory barriers were removed. In 1971,...
4 Pages 1695 Words
Voting and ensuring a secure election system for candidates in the government or any society is essential and undoubtedly one of the most important processes that needs to be managed with high precision so that a fair representation of the votes can be reflected when making the decision. However, with the advancement of technology and hacking tools available for exploitation, malicious methods are being put to test to infiltrate the database as well as voting machines to distort and create...
3 Pages 1570 Words
A significant portion of Donald Trump’s victory can be accorded to his popularity in rural areas, especially in the Rust Belt. The Rust Belt is a region in the US that was known for its thriving iron and steel industries, which has now been ravaged by economic decline due to deindustralisation, population loss and urban decay (Abadi and Gal, 2018). The loss of locally owned industry not only greatly diminished the people’s economic prospects for the future but greatly eroded...
4 Pages 1779 Words
The 2016 Presidential Election rekindled the debate over the fairness and democratic legitimacy of the Electoral College system. Despite losing the national popular vote by almost 2.9 million votes to opponent Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump was declared the winner of the 2016 Presidential election due to his 304-227 Electoral College victory (New York Times, 2017). It is this said potential of producing a so-called ‘wrong winner’ that invokes much of the controversy surrounding the current electoral system, and as such...
6 Pages 2838 Words
The Constitution of the United States (U.S) was ratified and signed on September 17th 1787. The aim of the Constitution was to establish a central government with sufficient power to act on a national level, whilst not having too much power that fundamental rights would be at risk. The U.S Constitution was at its time, very reflective of the citizens and their political needs at the time. However, it is not my belief that the U.S Constitution creates a democratic...
3 Pages 1376 Words
An electoral college is a set of electors who are selected to elect a candidate to particular offices. Often these represent different organizations, political parties or entities, with each organization, political party or entity represented by a particular number of electors or with votes weighted in a particular way. While most other Germanic nations had developed a strictly hereditary system by the end of the first millennium, the Holy Roman Empire did not, and the King of the Romans was...
2 Pages 1065 Words
There were 158 million Americans who voted in the past 2020 election but only 538 votes decided our next president. The Electoral College was established in our Constitution in 1804 and was created by the Founding Fathers. The way the system works is there are 538 electoral votes among all the 50 states and it takes 270 votes for a candidate to win. We the people do not vote directly for the president but we are voting for a group...
4 Pages 1668 Words
The Electoral College has been around since the beginning of democracy in America. The Founding Fathers set up the Electoral College in order to vote for a president every four years. The Electoral College gives each state, and D.C., a number of votes based on population. November 8th every four years, any citizen 18 years of age or older can vote for the candidate of their choosing. Based on the number of popular votes that candidate receives in each state,...
2 Pages 768 Words
The 2016 election of Donald Trump put many things in motion. The 2020 election might do the same thing—especially if President Trump is re-elected in a manner similar to his 2016 victory. That’s because his election led to ongoing attacks on an invention of our constitutional founding fathers. That invention, of course, is the electoral college. For the fourth time in our history a Democrat presidential candidate who won the popular vote was denied the presidency by failing to win...
2 Pages 953 Words
I think that the electoral college should be taken away. I don’t think that the popular vote would be the best choice to replace it with. But I don’t think that the electoral college is working very well. There has been multiple times when the person who got the popular vote did not win when they got a lot more votes than the other person. For example in our 2016 election Hillary had around 3,000,000 more votes than Trump but...
1 Page 628 Words
It is worth noting that the presence of the Electoral College contradicts the existing belief that, in a democracy, the winner is the one who receives the most votes. This system was introduced to eliminate the possibility that a large state would impose its political position on the whole country. Despite the possible advantages, there are certain aspects that illustrate the need to alter the existing approach. The purpose of this paper is to provide arguments to prove that the...
1 Page 637 Words
Every government has a system in place to effectively chose a leader. This system for the United States is described as the Electoral College. Composed by the Founding Fathers, the process provides a modus operandi of election. The Electoral College allows smaller states to have a say and was created to prevent political manipulation. It has been the electoral system for the United States for over 200 years. In 1787, towards the end of the Constitutional Convention, the electoral college...
2 Pages 735 Words
Every four years our country participates in the most thrilling and suspenseful race of all time, the Presidential elections. One of the most anxious times that leaves all Americans anxious and eager to know who will be elected President. On the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November, every four years the presidential election is held. Around 138 million voters race to their local voting polls to submit their ballots for who they want to be their next President....
3 Pages 1443 Words
What is a democracy? In the United States democracy is the ability to vote and elect freely and equally. The problem is that some people are not educated about voting, which the United States attempted to solve with an electoral college, a group of delegates whose votes matter more, as a safety net. This unfortunately did not work as well as the government had hoped and only made things more complicated. The electoral college should stop being used because of...
1 Page 428 Words
Have you ever imagined a person who earned more votes than the other candidate but did not win the election ? Today, I am planning to focus on the topic popular people's vote and electoral vote for my paper. NPV, as stated by Wikipedia, is, “ The National Popular Vote Interstate Compact (NPVIC) is an agreement among a group of U.S. states and the District of Columbia to award all their electoral votes to whichever presidential candidate wins the overall...
3 Pages 1177 Words
The electoral college is the system used to elect the president in the USA. There are several strengths of the system, such as that it ensures candidates campaign in a variety of states not just a few. There are also many weaknesses of the electoral college system; states can become safe seats; the result can be unrepresentative of public wishes and smaller states may have disproportionate levels of influence. A strength of the Electoral college system is that it promotes...
1 Page 410 Words
The Electoral College is a group of representatives derived from each state and the District of Columbia, whose major role is to elect the president and the vice president of the United States of America. The College is established by the constitution of the United States, and it has been a critical part of America’s political system for decades. The candidate who gets the majority of the electoral votes is given authority to lead the country after the outcome of...
4 Pages 1882 Words
Understanding the Electoral College Should the electoral college be abolished? Many people within the American electorate believe that they, themselves, vote for the president of the United States. Little do they know, the president is elected by one of the most undemocratic political institutions in this country – the Electoral College. Presidential elections are determined not by popular vote but by an electoral college in which, in all but a few states, electors are assigned on a winnertake-all basis. Representation...
4 Pages 1795 Words
The Electoral College is the responsible cause of the unfair voting system in the United States today. In my senior year of high school, my teacher showed me that the Electoral College discourages many Americans from voting, and it mocks the idea of “one man, one vote.” I wrote an essay about the Electoral College entitled “We Need to Rid Ourselves of the Electoral College.” My opinion was and still is that the Electoral College is in need of mending....
2 Pages 862 Words
If you're a United States citizen, 18 years of age or older, you probably think you have the right to vote for presidential candidates in the national election. That's partially correct. When citizens cast their ballots for president in the popular vote, they elect a slate of electors. Electors then cast the votes that decide who becomes president of the United States. Usually, electoral votes align with the popular vote in an election. But a number of times in our...
1 Page 612 Words
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