Prison essays

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This essay will aim to critically discuss some of the challenges prisons face as a criminal justice agency in the present day and it will also discuss some strategies put in place to ease these challenges within prison. Prisons are the harshest form of punishment for an individual who has committed a criminal offence, The Ministry of Justice (2018) explains the purpose of imprisonment and some aims put in place. Firstly, protection of the public - prison protects the public...
4 Pages 1712 Words
Introduction to Prison Reform It is a proven fact that once someone from a family is imprisoned, family connections and relations become weaker. This means that every time someone is imprisoned, their family will not necessarily disperse, but grow apart. Prison systems in the United States should be reformed because medical care is lacking, guards are not getting the proper training, and prison programs (for drug rehabilitation, GED/college, and reintegration) are not available or need funding. Historical Initiatives in Prison...
4 Pages 1744 Words
Previously the role of a prison officer was merely a turnkey, expected to ensure that prisoners were behaving in a disciplined manner and safety was kept (Bennett et al., 2008). In the late nineteenth century and beyond, the role of the officer developed and changed, to a moral reformer. Previously seen as ‘invisible ghosts of penalty’ (Liebling, 200, p. 337), prison sociology depends on depiction of the guards as merely shadowy figure, peripheral influence (Sparks et al., 1996, p. 60)...
4 Pages 1615 Words
Do you know who Malcolm X is? A lot of people don't. But I am going to teach you about his life. Malcolm Little, better known as Malcolm X was born on May 19, 1925, in Omaha, Nebraska. He was the fourth of eight children. His parents were Earl Little and Loise Helen Norton Little. He and his family were harassed by the Klu Klux Klan. The harassment continued for a while. Earl Little, his father, moved his family to...
1 Page 541 Words
Being a mother in prison is not easy. Mothers in prisons face challenges that many members of the public are unaware of, challenges that affect both themselves and their children's well-being and upbringings. What challenges do these mothers face and why is this topic important to discuss? Why Is This Topic Important? Within the criminal justice system, women are seen as the least likely gender to be incarcerated, unlike males who hold most prison populations. However, throughout the years as...
4 Pages 1718 Words
The term “recidivism” is used to define the tendency of convicted criminals to return to being incarcerated after prior release. It is one of the most fundamental concepts in criminal justice and refers to a person's relapse into criminal behavior, often after the person receives sanctions or undergoes intervention for a previous crime. The Bureau of Justice Statistics included that 68% of released criminals returned to prison after 3 years of being released. This astounding number may come as a...
4 Pages 1892 Words
Prison overcrowding is not a new issue in the penal system in the United States. As far back as the original thirteen colonies, there have been problems surrounding the incarceration of criminals. Over the past century, different situations have caused fluctuations in the number of people confined to prisons, in both the federal and state-level justice systems. This issue is not only a threat to the general public, it can hurt state budgets, the employees that work in the complexes...
5 Pages 2516 Words
Literature Review The “School-to-Prison Pipeline” is an incessant trend, particularly within urban schools in America. It has increasingly been influenced by discriminatory policies causing disproportionate effects on certain adolescent groups and families on the basis of color. The implementation of a zero-tolerance policy has further mitigated the cause. Consistent Methodology and Methods Current Research goes to show the best possible way to conduct research with reverence to this particular subject has been a qualitative approach. Over fifty works of literature...
3 Pages 1557 Words
Women prisoners and their problems Everyone who is in prison faces so many obstacles, but when it comes to women prisoners we cannot say it in words as they bear so much pain. For the past 15 years, the number of women prisoners is increasing. Not every prisoner is accused of a crime, some are innocents, some are under trial and for some prisoners, and they don’t even know the charge made against them properly. Most women prisoners in India...
6 Pages 2977 Words
This literature review will overview current theory and knowledge regarding the crisis facing the British prison in the UK. It will utilise prison based literature to highlight a radical theory of penality (Paris, 2007) presented by Angela Davis, Joe Sim and others. The current situation surrounding the British prison is often cited in official reports and academia, alongside the strong presence of mainstream media control (Ibid). Using prison based literature, this review will use existing empirical evidence to draw data...
5 Pages 2072 Words
One of the most compelling aspects of a story is the rebirth of a character. Rebirth is often compared to the Phoenix, the mythical bird that would burn itself up and then experience rebirth from the ashes of that same fire. Ray Bradbury, the author of Fahrenheit 451, used the comparison of the Phoenix several times throughout the novel to describe the main character Guy Montag and the repressive society that he resided in. This novel is an example of...
3 Pages 1364 Words
The Prison Industrial Complex is seen as the new Jim Crow. Jim Crow laws started as early as 1865, after the slaves were freed due to the thirteenth amendment, which freed about four million people from slavery. The laws around slaves, how, when, and where freed slaves could find work and for how much, was strict. These ‘codes’ throughout the South would appear as a legal way to take away African American's right to vote, take away their own control...
4 Pages 1614 Words
For decades, illegal smuggling of drugs has been a severe problem in England and Wales prisons. According to Alex (2018), approximately 40% of incarcerated individuals test positive for drugs. Prisoners who use drugs suffer from mental and physical health complications, and their likelihood of recovering are minimal. Also, addicted prisoners pose a severe threat to the society since on release they often commit crimes to fund their habits. In a nutshell, the core purpose of the prisons is to reduce...
4 Pages 1950 Words
In England and Wales, the prison system is in crisis. Self-harming in prison has reached a record high of 61,461 cases in the past 12 months up to September 2019; compared to the previous 12 months that’s an increase of 16% (Government, 2020). The National Probation Service are also under pressure to provide appropriate rehabilitation and supervision services to prisoners who have left prison; however, there is a shortage of staff, which means there is a higher case load which...
4 Pages 1919 Words
1. Introduction An alarming number of prisoners are placed into custody around the world every day. There are over ten million inmates who reside in prison and overcrowding is a serious issue that must be addressed (Yeager, 2019:3). There are numerous causes related to prison overpopulation. These causes may include issues such as a significant increase in felonies, widespread poverty, and an increase in the number of arrests made (Victor-Zietsman, 2015:162). Furthermore, the student will examine why prison overcrowding is...
4 Pages 1735 Words
The image most individuals have of prison comes from how they are depicted in the media and reports. Prisons are often presented as violent institutions that are dangerous for the staff and inmates (Coyle, 2005). It is important to consider the origins and history behind prisons in order to understand what the prison's key purpose was and how that has developed through the years. Prison after the nineteenth century had a more rehabilitative approach to the inmates that were incarcerated....
6 Pages 2495 Words
The purpose of this essay is to explore the criminal justice system and its operations as well as dissect a chosen agency from within the CJS, considering the many thriving, hopeful developments that have been made in this field as well as the scrutiny of some decisions made and thus discussing where clear areas of improvement may lie. The agency chosen is imprisonment, this process sees a gap in research, proving many positives right as well as leaving much room...
3 Pages 1492 Words
Overview The preceding chapter presented the findings of the study using a thematic approach. This chapter discusses the findings presented in chapter four. This chapter is arranged based on subtitles arising from the major findings of each objective in chapter four. The subtitles in this chapter are arranged as follows; the international and national legal framework in relation to prisoner’s rights to remunerable employment, the extent to which the Zambia Correctional Service complies with international instruments in relation to prisoner’s...
4 Pages 1970 Words
Human immune-deficiency virus HIV (human immuno-deficiency virus) is a virus which damages a person’s immune system and weakens the ability of a person’s body to be able to fight infections (Haas, 1993). Segregation of HIV positive prisoners was a common practice during the first discovery of the disease, due to added pressure on prison officials to reduce the growing spread of HIV in prisons. The lack of education and understanding of the disease led to segregation and stigma of prisoners...
3 Pages 1478 Words
Prior to the 15th Century, incarceration itself was not considered a punishment, but rather a way of holding those who were in debt or awaiting trial. As well as common criminals, prisons at this time were also used to detain political prisoners, prisoners of war, slaves and those convicted of treason. Particularly in the case of the traitor, the prison provided a venue to exhibit the prisoner prior to his punishment. Many of these early prisons were built partially underground...
2 Pages 1087 Words
'We would consider it cruel to confine a dog permanently in a kennel. Yet we visit zoos where hundreds of wild animals are kept permanently in the equivalent of a kennel.' Virginia McKenna. The existence of zoos goes back many years, but people are beginning to express concern for the welfare of the animals within the zoo. This is due to the unfortunate lack of effective protection and enforcement that ensure their well-being. The idea of zoos was meant for...
2 Pages 921 Words
Should prisoners retain their right to vote? Stewart in his article “Terrorism and Human Rights” defined human rights as the essential rights and freedoms that belong to each person within the world, from birth until death. They apply despite where you're from, what you suspect, or how you select to measure your life. They will never be got rid of, although they will sometimes be restricted – for instance, if someone breaks the law, or is within the interests of...
2 Pages 1075 Words
According to Martin Luther King Jr. “No nation can long continue to flourish or to find its way to a better society while it allows any one of its citizens to be denied the right to participate in the most fundamental of all privileges-the right to vote”. A prisoner, who is also referred to as an inmate, is anyone who is deprived of liberty against their will and can be lawfully confined or unlawfully confined (Justice and peace commission, 2011)....
2 Pages 833 Words
Franchising felons from voting has an impact on elections, silences the voice that felons have, and strips them of a right that they should have. In the 2016 elections, many states were close, with some winning by only a small margin. Florida was within 120,000 votes to swing for Hillary Clinton ('2016 Presidential'), which is very close given the population of Florida. As mentioned earlier, Florida had over 1.6 million felons that were stripped of their voting rights. Had all...
2 Pages 974 Words
Although solitary confinement has been used in the United States for over a century, it is time to put an end to this abhorrent punishment. Solitary confinement has been proven over the years to be detrimental to the mental health of inmates. According to an article from the journal Crime and Justice, a staggering percentage of prisoners suffer detrimental mental damage from solitary confinement. Questioned prisoners pointed to stress, thoughts of suicide, hallucinations, and difficulty sleeping as symptoms suffered (Smith,...
4 Pages 1630 Words
Private prisons are correctional and rehabilitation institutions that are managed by third-party institutions, not the state government as commonly perceived. In the USA, private prisons are mainly funded by the government through governmental contracts, which are majorly based on the number of prisoners and the average length of the prisoners’ sentences. It implies that the more the number of inmates these institutions can house with longer sentences, the more funding they get from the government. Ideally, private prisons are portrayed...
1 Page 651 Words
There are many concerning issues within juvenile corrections. One of those pressing issues is solitary confinement. Solitary confinement is defined as the isolation of a prisoner in a separate cell as a form of punishment. Every day across the United States, young people under the age of 18 are placed in solitary confinement. In this essay, I will discuss the issue surrounding juveniles in solitary confinement compared to Germany’s treatment of juveniles and the ways it has improved. According to...
3 Pages 1133 Words
Can you imagine what it would be like to be dumb? Not being able to express your opinions because no one cared to pay attention to your gibberish. For many inmates, disenfranchisement, which is the act of depriving one’s right to vote, is identical to being democratically dumb. The issue of felon disenfranchisement has been a long-standing one in our Jamaican history, and in support of that, many have argued that prisoners are not responsible citizens so they should not...
2 Pages 935 Words
Does prison work? 1. Introduction Prisons, most commonly known as correctional institutions, have been an integral part of the Criminal Justice System along with the Police and the Courts. Even though prisons and sentencing vary from country to country, they all operate in same manner, for example to sentence criminals and prevent further damage to society. Offenders are usually sent to prison when a legal penalty is imposed on them. Prison is considered to be as the last resort. In...
6 Pages 2755 Words
In comparison to the rest of the developed world, the United States of America has one of the most punitive prison systems. The government claims that its prisons focus on rehabilitation, yet on average, 60 percent of all inmates will return to prison (Chung). Felons’ lives are thereby deemed unlivable because they are perceived as morally corrupt, “social contract” breakers. As a consequence, most state governments, aside from Maine and Vermont, prohibit felons from participating in democratic processes. While the...
3 Pages 1591 Words
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