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Prison Essays

20 samples in this category

The Problems and Ways of Improvement the Prison System in the UK

In England and Wales, the prison system is in crisis. Self-harming in prison has reached a record high of 61,461 cases in the past 12 months up to September 2019; compared to the previous 12 months that’s an increase of 16% (Government, 2020). The National Probation Service are also under pressure to provide appropriate rehabilitation and supervision services to prisoners who have left prison; however, there is a shortage of staff, which means there is a higher case load which...
4 Pages 1975 Words

The Peculiarities Of Prison Officer Work

Previously the role of a prison officer was merely a turnkey, expected to ensure that prisoners were behaving in a disciplined manner and safety was kept (Bennett et al., 2008). In the late nineteenth century and beyond, the role of the officer developed and changed, to a moral reformer. Previously seen as ‘invisible ghosts of penalty’ (Liebling, 200, p. 337), prison sociology depends on depiction of the guards as merely shadowy figure, peripheral influence (Sparks et al., 1996, p. 60)...
4 Pages 1639 Words

Prison Reform Essay: The Reasons And Significance

It is a proven fact that once someone from a family is imprisoned, family connections and relations become weaker. This means that every time someone is imprisoned, their family will not necessarily disperse, but grow apart. Prison systems in the United States should be reformed because medical care is lacking, guards are not getting the proper training, and prison programs (for drug rehabilitation, GED/college, and reintegration) are not available or need funding. Prison reform was started in the early 1840’s...
4 Pages 1703 Words

The Reasons, Types And Effects Of Drugs In Prison

For decades, illegal smuggling of drugs has been a severe problem in England and Wales prisons. According to Alex (2018), approximately 40% of incarcerated individuals test positive for drugs. Prisoners who use drugs suffer from mental and physical health complications, and their likelihood of recovering are minimal. Also, addicted prisoners pose a severe threat to the society since on release they often commit crimes to fund their habits. In a nutshell, the core purpose of the prisons is to reduce...
4 Pages 1975 Words

The Challenges And Issues Prison Face As A Criminal Justice Agency

This essay will aim to critically discuss some of the challenges prisons face as a criminal justice agency in the present day and it will also discuss some strategies put in place to ease these challenges within prison. Prisons are the harshest form of punishment for an individual who has committed a criminal offence, The Ministry of Justice (2018) explains the purpose of imprisonment and some aims put in place. Firstly, protection of the public – prison protects the public...
4 Pages 1752 Words

Overview Of Criminal Justice System And Explaining Imprisonment

The purpose of this essay is to explore the criminal justice system and its operations as well as dissect a chosen agency from within the CJS, considering the many thriving, hopeful developments that have been made in this field as well as the scrutiny of some decisions made and thus discussing where clear areas of improvement may lie. The agency chosen is imprisonment, this process sees a gap in research, proving many positives right as well as leaving much room...
3 Pages 1504 Words

The Prison Industrial Complex and the New Jim Crow: Analytical Essay

The Prison Industrial Complex is seen as the new Jim Crow. Jim Crow laws started as early as 1865, after the slaves were freed due to the thirteenth amendment, which freed about four million people from slavery. The laws around slaves, how, when, and where freed slaves could find work and for how much, was strict. These ‘codes’ throughout the South would appear as a legal way to take away African American’s right to vote, take away their own control...
4 Pages 1611 Words

Reintegration Of Ex-prisoners Using The Human Rights Approach

Overview The preceding chapter presented the findings of the study using a thematic approach. This chapter discusses the findings presented in chapter four. This chapter is arranged based on subtitles arising from the major findings of each objective in chapter four. The subtitles in this chapter are arranged as follows; the international and national legal framework in relation to prisoner’s rights to remunerable employment, the extent to which the Zambia Correctional Service complies with international instruments in relation to prisoner’s...
4 Pages 1953 Words

Segregation and Stigma of HiIV Positive Prisoners

Human immune-deficiency virus HIV (human immuno-deficiency virus) is a virus which damages a person’s immune system and weakens the ability of a person’s body to be able to fight infections (Haas, 1993). Segregation of HIV positive prisoners was a common practice during the first discovery of the disease, due to added pressure on prison officials to reduce the growing spread of HIV in prisons. The lack of education and understanding of the disease led to segregation and stigma of prisoners...
3 Pages 1479 Words

A Brief History of Prisons

Prior to the 15th Century, incarceration itself was not considered a punishment, but rather a way of holding those who were in debt or awaiting trial. As well as common criminals, prisons at this time were also used to detain political prisoners, prisoners of war, slaves and those convicted of treason. Particularly in the case of the traitor, the prison provided a venue to exhibit the prisoner prior to his punishment. Many of these early prisons were built partially underground...
2 Pages 1078 Words

Exploring the Prison Crisis: Influence of Radical Theory on Abolitionism

This literature review will overview current theory and knowledge regarding the crisis facing the British prison in the UK. It will utilise prison based literature to highlight a radical theory of penality (Paris, 2007) presented by Angela Davis, Joe Sim and others. The current situation surrounding the British prison is often cited in official reports and academia, alongside the strong presence of mainstream media control (Ibid). Using prison based literature, this review will use existing empirical evidence to draw data...
5 Pages 2087 Words

Essay on Why Prisoners Should not Be Allowed to Vote

Should prisoners retain their right to vote? Stewart in his article “Terrorism and Human Rights” defined human rights as the essential rights and freedoms that belong to each person within the world, from birth until death. They apply despite where you’re from, what you suspect, or how you select to measure your life. They will never be got rid of, although they will sometimes be restricted – for instance, if someone breaks the law, or is within the interests of...
2 Pages 1067 Words

Essay on Why Should Felons Be Allowed to Vote

According to Martin Luther King Jr. “No nation can long continue to flourish or to find its way to a better society while it allows any one of its citizens to be denied the right to participate in the most fundamental of all privileges-the right to vote”. A prisoner, who is also referred to as an inmate, is anyone who is deprived of liberty against their will and can be lawfully confined or unlawfully confined (Justice and peace commission, 2011)....
2 Pages 837 Words

Analytical Essay on Application of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in Prisons

Introduction Prison is defined as “A building in which people are legally held as a punishment for a crime they have committed or while awaiting trial” and in which inmates are involuntarily detained and have many of their freedoms restricted under the law. And the concept of them is designed to achieve four main purposes; “retribution, incapacitation, deterrence, and rehabilitation.” However, there is a constant debate worldwide surrounding most countries’ prison systems and their effectiveness in achieving the four purposes...
7 Pages 3016 Words

Critical Evaluation of the Functions of and Concerns around Prisons

The image most individuals have of prison comes from how they are depicted in the media and reports. Prisons are often presented as violent institutions that are dangerous for the staff and inmates (Coyle, 2005). It is important to consider the origins and history behind prisons in order to understand what the prison’s key purpose was and how that has developed through the years. Prison after the nineteenth century had a more rehabilitative approach to the inmates that were incarcerated....
6 Pages 2537 Words

Discursive Essay on Prison Issues

Women prisoners and their problems Everyone who is in prison faces so many obstacles, but when it comes to women prisoners we cannot say it in words as they bear so much pain. For the past 15 years, the number of women prisoners is increasing. Not every prisoner is accused of a crime, some are innocents, some are under trial and for some prisoners, and they don’t even know the charge made against them properly. Most women prisoners in India...
6 Pages 2949 Words

Essay on Effectiveness and Role of Prisons

Does prison work? 1. Introduction Prisons, most commonly known as correctional institutions, have been an integral part of the Criminal Justice System along with the Police and the Courts. Even though prisons and sentencing vary from country to country, they all operate in same manner, for example to sentence criminals and prevent further damage to society. Offenders are usually sent to prison when a legal penalty is imposed on them. Prison is considered to be as the last resort. In...
6 Pages 2742 Words

Essay on Prisons: Solitary Confinement in the United States and Austria

Prisons exist around the world and every prison is different in each country. Individuals that defy the law will be subject to different punishments and every country implements different forms of punishment. In Austria, fines and incarceration are two punishments for offenders who break the law. Offenders who have a poor financial status have difficulty paying their fines, so they will be incarcerated for a certain amount of time (Bruckmüller & Graft, n.d.). However, 2008 was a turning point because...
10 Pages 4543 Words

Impact of Prisons on Prisoners' Recidivism

The oxford definition of recidivism is defined as, the act or habit of continuing to commit crimes even after being punished (Oxford, 1879) and is such an important topic in society because of the danger and impact that prisoners by using restorative justice, repairing the harm done by the criminal and helping them through a rehabilitation process to prepare them for post-release societal integration. (STERBENZ, 2014). The Norwegian prison system takes the approach of rehabilitation whereby the aim is to...
7 Pages 3024 Words

Argumentative Essay on Felons Voting

Voting Rights for Felons On November 8, 2016, an estimated 6.1 million citizens were barred from engaging in casting their votes because of felony charges (Cheung). This disenfranchised population included people currently in jail and also millions of people under parole or probation, and those who had completed their sentence. It is estimated that 3.1 million people are denied their right to vote because of laws that restrict them even when the sentence is complete. According to a report by...
3 Pages 1181 Words
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